Cover of A Phantom Lover

A Phantom Lover

Auhtor: Vernon Lee

Language: english
Published: 1890

Genres:

romance,  ghost stories
Downloads: 382
eBook size: 277Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Phantom Lover':

Professor David Vernon Williams is the deputy dean of the University of Aucklands Faculty of Law. He came from the Hawkes Bay region of New Zealand and was educated at Wanganui Collegiate School. His formal tertiary education qualifications include undergraduate degrees in history and in law from Victoria University of Wellington a graduate degree in law from the University of Oxford England where he was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College and a doctoral research qualification from the University of Dar es Salaam Tanzania that included an analysis of colonial legal history in New Zealand and a Diploma in Theology from the University of Oxford. He is a barrister and solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand and holds a practising certificate to act as a barrister. He was employed as a legal academic at universities in England Tanzania and New Zealand from 1971 to 1991 and during that time he wrote numerous published articles and book chapters on issues related to colonial law indigenous law and the Treaty of Waitangi. From 1992 to 2000 his primary occupation was as a consultant contracted to research on law in history and on Treaty of Waitangi-related legal issues. He has acted in a variety of capacities in contracts with the Crown Forestry Rental Trust the Law Commission and Te Puni K?kiri. He was responsible for the M?ori Land Legislation Manual (and Database) which was published in two volumes by the Crown Forestry Rental Trust in 1994 and 1995. He is the author of Te Kooti Tango Whenua?: The Native Land Court 1864?1909 published by Huia Publishers in 1999. He has acted as an arbitrator in respect of M?ori-owned forestry land. He is the honorary legal adviser to Te P?hopatanga o Aotearoa (Anglican Church) and a member of the Anglican Church?s General Synod/Te Hinota Whanui. In 2001 he was appointed an associate professor in law at the University of Auckland and in 2005 was promoted to full professor. He also campaigned for the New Zealand National Party in 1966 but has never voted for them.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Phantom Lover':


... and urged me to write it out at once, although I protested that, in such matters, to write is to exorcise, to dispel the charm and that printers' ...
... yet there was time. We had meanwhile driven into a large park, or rather a long succession of grazing-grounds, dotted about with large oaks, under which ...
... rooms that were allotted to me, I threw myself into an arm-chair and tried to focus the extraordinary imaginative impression which this house had given ...
... her, as I see her now, if I shut my eyes-even if it were only a silhouette. There. I see her so plainly, walking slowly up and down a room, the slight ...
... no more heed of him than of a table or chair, was producing a vague depression and irritation in this young man, so evidently cut out for a cheerful, ...
... childish he is. she exclaimed when we were alone. He really minds, really feels disgraced by what our ancestors did two centuries and a half ago. ...
... that I was handling explosive substances. A man is surely not responsible if the people with whom he is forced to deal, and whom he deals with as with ...
... It was the most extraordinary craze, of all the extraordinary crazes of childless and idle women, that I had ever met but it was more than that, it ...
... comparatively gloomy. This time Mr. Oke struck me as really too childish. I felt an intense desire to badger him. The yellow drawing-room. I exclaimed. ...
... with that little perplexed frown of his, I felt intensely sorry for this man. But this feeling did not last. There was no help for it: Oke was not ...
... her mind. It sometimes struck me as if she were telling me, speaking of herself in the third person, of her own feelings-as if I were listening ...
... Mrs. Oke, on seeing me. Look what a beautiful evening-and look at that dear little cart. It is so long since I have driven, and I feel as if ...
... was doing the honours of it as if a house full of commonplace, noisy young creatures, bent upon flirting and tennis, were her usual idea of felicity. The ...
... with its vaulted and ribbed ceiling, dotted about with groups or single figures that seemed to have come straight from the past. Even William Oke, who, ...
... in which he foresaw great glory to himself. And every now and then there would arrive some young gentleman or lady, whom Alice Oke had sent for ...
... turn crimson, and almost tremble the mention of Lovelock brought a helpless look, half a convulsion, like that of a man overcome by great heat, into ...
... before. Oke was silent for a moment, looking fixedly at the rug at his feet, when he suddenly burst out in a scarce audible voice-. If you knew ...
... of lambs and calling of sheep, while the wind began to catch the topmost branches of the trees. Suddenly Mr. Oke broke the silence. I don't ...
... out and draws to it all that may remain of that lover's soul, and takes shape and surrounds the beloved one once more.. Mrs. Oke was speaking slowly, ...
... into the room, and I after him. As I crossed the threshold, something flashed in my eyes there was a loud report, a sharp cry, and the thud of a body ...