Cover of A Prairie Infanta

A Prairie Infanta

Auhtor: Eva Wilder Brodhead

Language: english
Published: 1904

Genres:

fiction and literature,  young readers
Downloads: 135
eBook size: 116Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, March 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Prairie Infanta':

A Prairie Infanta by Eva Wilder Brodhead. This children s book is from 1904. A clever Western story that develops in a little Colorado mining town. One is made to see the green tall cottonwoods the straggling mud-houses and pungent goat-corrals of its people among whom lived the woman who took to her great heart the motherless Lola. The tropical brilliancy of the girl by reason of her red frock and the red ribbons in her hair excites the jealousy of the little Mexicans and the paler children from the mining end of the town and in their disapproval they style her Infanta. The story of the girl s life is charmingly told and eventually her father a man who despite some failings is generous and well-meaning reappears in the character of a wealthy mine owner and brings the story to an unlooked for and happy termination.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Prairie Infanta':


... doctor seemed perplexed. He looked distractedly about, and seeing Jane Combs in her field, called to her and came running. He reached the fence breathless, ...
... to pass the little girl from hand to hand and out into the air. Seeing, however, that this was accomplished, she descended into the crowd of villagers ...
... if you can.. Keene tilted his chair restlessly. He looked as if life was regaining its poise with him, and his voice seemed quite cheerful as he ...
... The muchacha was left to you. It is a charge very sacred. Ave Maria. yes.. Jane had closed the gate. I can't force her, she repeated. Seora ...
... on cheerfully to say, There isn't one in my body hasn't been splintered by these broncos. Tinker 'em up and they're better than new. Here's doc coming ...
... before her, holding it above the reach of the alfalfa's snatching green fingers. It was a square pedestal of adobe, sun-baked hard as stone, upon which ...
... had intended for Lola and in view of his unsettled circumstances he thought it might be well if Miss Combs could place the girl in some family where ...
... upon every one the sense of a personal affront. Lola's quickness of retort was also against her. The swift flash of her eye, the sudden quiver of her ...
... fabrics for which Jane, spurred by the approach of the vacation and the fact that Lola was to have a part in the closing exercises of school, had ...
... would have gone far with her. No, Miss Jane, it wouldn't have hurt her to be humbled. It won't now.. I don't believe it ever does any one any ...
... struck against his arm, and turning irritably, he saw Jane. What's all this. said she, placidly. What are you saying to make my little girl so ...
... altered except that now other rooms opened brightly on all sides, and in one a piano displayed its white teeth in beaming welcome. Lola's blank face, ...
... a pleased smile at these things, and listened with enforced attention to the speeches and the music, there were present with her foreboding and unrest. ...
... in her endless thread. Ten children keep the needle hot. Ay, but this knot is a hard one. There are evil spirits about.. She laid down her work ...
... thankful so plain a face as hers should find favor with Jos Montoya. My Ana is full of loving thoughts. She never lets her friends forget what poor, sinning ...
... among the barren ridges. She reflected quietly upon meeting Jane without a hint of any shadow in her face, but in such sunniness of humor as should ...
... awaited her in Jane's sitting-room gathered a graciousness which exalted him, as if he, too, had been dead and was alive again. The talk broke off ...
... now Lola, who had received him with such flattering warmth, was turning her face away and looking strange and stern and stricken. Nor did Miss Combs ...
... suffered in keeping me from knowing things which would have hurt me too much when I was little and-and could not make allowances-as I can now. My ...
... award-winning journalist Ed Moloney. In The Blanket, an on-line journal, reviewer Liam O Ruairc described the book as potentially the standard if not ...