Cover of A Christmas Carol The Original Manuscript

A Christmas Carol The Original Manuscript

Auhtor: Charles Dickens

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 248
eBook size: 131Kb

Review by O. Brown, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Christmas Carol The Original Manuscript':

Dickens C. A Christmas carol.--Sangster M. E. The Christmas babe.--Corning Mrs. W. H. A western Christmas.--Bacheller I. Joes search for Santa Claus.--Schayer J. Angelas Christmas.--The first Puritan Christmas tree.--Butterworth H. First New England Christmas.--Dickens C. The chimes.--Redmond C. Billys Santa Claus experience.--Stowe Mrs. H. B. Christmas in Poganuc.--Molesworth Mrs. Th

Excerpts from the Book 'A Christmas Carol The Original Manuscript':


... that although the court was of the narrowest, the houses opposite were mere phantoms. To see the dingy cloud come drooping down, obscuring everything, ...
... from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course, said Scrooge. I'm very glad to hear it. Under ...
... at blindman's-buff. Scrooge took his melancholy dinner in his usual melancholy tavern and having read all the news-papers, and beguiled the rest ...
... On the wings of the wind, replied the Ghost. You might have got over a great quantity of ground in seven years, said Scrooge. ...
... had gone three quarters more, when he remembered, on a sudden, that the Ghost had [Illustration: Original manuscript of Page 17.] [Illustration: ...
... these boys were in great spirits, and shouted to each other, until the broad fields were so full of merry music, that the crisp air laughed to hear ...
... and threw him into a dreadful state of mind by shaking hands with him. He then conveyed him and his sister into the veriest old well of a shivering ...
... had gone all through the dance advance and retire, hold hands with your partner bow and curtsey corkscrew thread-the-needle, and back again ...
... he seized the extinguisher-cap, and by a sudden action pressed it down upon its head. The Spirit dropped beneath it, so that the extinguisher ...
... was powerless to make out what it meant, or would be at and was sometimes apprehensive that he might be at that very moment an interesting case of ...
... But soon the steeples called good people all, to church and chapel, and away they came, flocking through the streets in their best clothes, and with ...
... Martha, who was a poor apprentice at a milliner's, then told them what kind of work she had to do, and how many hours she worked at a stretch, ...
... to Scrooge, while listening to the moaning of the wind, and thinking what a solemn thing it was to move on through the lonely darkness over an ...
... not to cut in the eye, was not sharper than Scrooge: blunt as he took it in his head to be. The Ghost was greatly pleased to find him ...
... them with its freshest tints, a stale and shrivelled hand, like that of age, had pinched, and twisted them, and pulled them into shreds. Where angels ...
... thoughtful quest, he fancied from the turn of the hand, and its situation in reference to himself, that the Unseen Eyes were looking at him keenly. ...
... Ha, ha! laughed the same woman, when old Joe, producing a flannel bag with money in it, told out their several gains upon the ground. This is ...
... the extraordinary kindness of Mr. Scrooge's nephew, whom he had scarcely seen but once, and who, meeting him in the street that day, and [Illustration: ...
... cried Scrooge, laughing and crying in the same breath and making a perfect Laocoon of himself with his stockings. I am as light as a feather, ...
... this very afternoon, over a Christmas bowl of smoking bishop, Bob! Make up the fires, and buy another coal-scuttle before you dot another i, ...