Cover of A Forgotten Hero

A Forgotten Hero

Auhtor: Emily Sarah Holt

Language: english
Published: 1883

Genres:

fiction and literature,  history,  romance
Downloads: 70
eBook size: 168Kb

Review by O. Brown, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Forgotten Hero':

A Forgotten Hero by Emily Sarah Holt. Excerpt from the book... Clarice with another courtesy and a murmur of thanks took her seat in the recess of the window where her mother was already sitting. For these two were mother and daughter a middle-aged comfortable-looking mother with a mixture of firmness and good-nature in her face and a daughter of some sixteen years rather pale and slender but active and intelligent in her appearance. Clarice s dark hair was smoothly brushed and turned up in a curl all round her head being cut sufficiently short for that purpose. Her dress was long and loose made in what we call the Princess style with a long train which she tucked under one arm when she walked.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Forgotten Hero':


... be loving reverence and sympathy. And now, Clarice, I have another thing to say.. At your pleasure, Dame.. I think it but meet to tell thee ...
... conviction that Mistress Underdone, at least, would be pleasant enough to live with. You will wish, without doubt, to go down to hall, where is good ...
... himself at his convenience. People who were very delicate and particular wiped their knives on a piece of bread before doing so, and licked their spoons ...
... stony dignity, and never took any notice of it. Needlework followed until dinner, after which the Countess gave audience for an hour to any person desiring ...
... it is a pious deed, of course, said Lancaster, stroking his moustache, not in the dilettante style of De Echingham, but like a man lost in thought. ...
... consequent upon the seeing. The blind has the advantage, sometimes.. Yet who would wish to be blind on that account. answered the Earl, quickly. No ...
... the angry complaints of nobles who were jealous that he listened to and bestowed gifts on other men than themselves. But we do see some faint glimpses ...
... laying each piece of material neatly folded on the last, until the table held a tall heap of them. Now for hoods, pursued the Countess. Black ...
... to put up with the same thing in our turn. I haven't got the man I should have chosen but I suppose it won't matter a hundred years hence.. I am ...
... it into words, even to herself but it was this-that God meant something. He was not sitting on the throne of the universe in placid indifference to ...
... Clarice, my dame tells me thou art not altogether well pleased with thy wedding. What didst thou wish otherwise, lass.. The man, said Clarice, ...
... it that its mother at least should never think it a nuisance. What shall I call her. she said to Mistress Underdone and Olympias, both of whom were ...
... when thou hast seen His Face in righteousness-dear Clarice, thou wilt know it, and want to add no yet.. The soft tap of Heliet's crutches had ...
... answered Ada. I am tired of everything.. Felicia came in as the words were spoken. I have permission to tell you something, she said, with a light ...
... to it which she calls the interpretation of the Church, derived from the consent of the Fathers. That the Fathers scarcely ever consent to anything ...
... was that she had reached Berkhamsted in safety, to her own intense enjoyment for she had never before been a mile from Oakham, and the discovery that ...
... pretending to catch her, Rosie, to the dismay of all parties, ran straight against her father, who had just reached the top of the spiral staircase ...
... await his return. It was a hot July day, and Vivian, who highly disapproved of the stagnation of Berkhamsted, declared his intention of going out to ...
... can tell how-I have imagined that my life will not be long. It makes me the more anxious to do all I can ere `the night cometh in which no man ...
... that were not enough, in a man. Mother Margaret's sense of decorum was quite outraged. How could such thoughts trouble the blessed peace of a holy ...