Cover of First Plays

First Plays

Auhtor: A Milne

Language: english
Published: 1919

Genres:

drama
Downloads: 182
eBook size: 138Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, May 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'First Plays':

Winning Ways for your Mathematical Plays (Academic Press 1982) by Elwyn R. Berlekamp John H. Conway and Richard K. Guy is a compendium of information on mathematical games. It was first published in 1982 in two volumes. The first volume introduces combinatorial game theory and its foundation in the surreal numbers partizan and impartial games Sprague-Grundy theory and misere games. The second volume applies the theorems of the first volume to many games including nim sprouts dots and boxes Sylver coinage philosophers football fox and geese. A final section on puzzles analyzes the Soma cube Rubiks Cube peg solitaire and Conways game of life. A republication of the work by A K Peters splits the content into four volumes.

Excerpts from the Book 'First Plays':


... been in love with ROBERT CRAWSHAW for twenty-five years, the last twenty four years from habit. She is small, comfortable, and rather foolish you would ...
... so it can't be very serious. RICHARD. What a reputation. CRAWSHAW. Well, it's over now. MARGARET. Viola had better know, hadn't she. CRAWSHAW. ...
... He is very fond of Towser Towser is always coming in. (Frankly) You see, Mr. Crawshaw, this is my first real case, and I only got it because Antony ...
... one, the good-looking one, the lucky one, the county cricketer, the plus three at golf-. WENTWORTH. Oh Lord. I thought you'd get golf into it. I ...
... damnable than usual. BOB. Yes. MISS FARRINGDON. Any particular reason why. BOB (after a long pause). No. (MISS FARRINGDON nods to herself and ...
... That ends Marcus. You're well rid of him. BOB (miserably). Perhaps it isn't only Marcus. GERALD (sharply, after this has sunk in). What can they ...
... you are out remember that. GERALD. He never ought to have gone into business at all. Why couldn't you have had him taught farming or estate agency ...
... (rather startled). What. BOB. What shall we do directly after I come out. PAMELA. Well, I suppose we-I mean you-well, we'll come up ...
... hadn't been so confident. GERALD. I trusted you. You had told me. I knew I should never change, and I thought I knew you wouldn't. PAMELA. I was ...
... of the excess-profits tax. You see, jam is a thing the Army wants. PHILIP. It certainly gets it. EMILY. It was so nice for him, because it made ...
... the company by this time, you see. Well, there were three things I could do-hang on, move to this other trench, against orders, or go back myself and ...
... Yes, ma'am. BELINDA. That's right, Betty. Well now, if Mr. Devenish calls-he is the rather poetical gentleman-. BETTY. Yes, ma'am the one who's ...
... And you shall put your hair up so as to feel more disguised. What fun we're going to have. DELIA. You baby. All right, then, I'm Miss Robinson, ...
... line. (To DEVENISH.) Mr. Devenish, it was a great disappointment to me that all the poems in your book seemed to be written to somebody else. DEVENISH. ...
... for its length. DELIA. But if it annoys me too. DEVENISH (heroically). It shall go. DELIA (apologetically). I told you I wasn't a very ...
... a pause.) Have you ever met a man called Baxter. TREMAYNE. No. DEVENISH. Would you like to. TREMAYNE (grimly). Very much indeed. DEVENISH. He's ...
... If you want an answer now, it's no but if you like to wait till next April-. DEVENISH (reproachfully). Oh, I say, and I cut my hair for you ...
... I think that's rather a nice age to be, don't you. TREMAYNE. A very nice age to be. BELINDA. It's a pity he's thrown me over for Delia I shall ...
... the other birds. MOTHER. I don't understand you, sir. Are you referring to my daughter. TALKER (looking towards the window). There is a stream ...
... TALKER and the MOTHER come in arm-in-arm. He bows to her and takes the floor.]. TALKER. Ladies and gentlemen, companions-in-arms, knights and ladies ...