Cover of A Short History Of England

A Short History Of England

Auhtor: G Chesterton

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 204
eBook size: 211Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Short History Of England':

A Short History Of England G K Chesterton by G K Chesterton. Chesterton has been called the Prince of Paradox. His works include journalism philosophy poetry biography fantasy and detective stories. Chesterton says he decided to write this work because up till now no one has written a history that shows the populace in a favorable light. Most histories depict the people of a country as ignorant or in most instances wrong. Chesterton hoped to right this wrong.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Short History Of England':


... is thus a thread of theory leading to its latter claims to have the sole right of taxing. But in the beginning it was an instrument of the most equitable ...
... immediately under his nose. Thackeray was a great man but in that matter he was a very small man, and indeed an invisible one. The cases of Wallace ...
... about his appreciation of the Renascence. He was above all things a Humanist and a very human one. He was even in many ways very modern, which ...
... society. By this creed most of the mystical virtues of the old monks have simply been turned into great sins and the greatest of these is charity. ...
... they dwell on old enemies often blinds them to new ones. In a later generation Cromwell exhibited the same error reversed, and continued to keep a hostile ...
... though almost wholly the middle classes of the towns. By the poor agricultural population, which was still by far the largest part of the population, ...
... the eighteenth century there were great gentlemen in the generous, perhaps too generous, sense now given to the title. Types not merely honest, but ...
... in France there was no such fine speaking as in England. The Parliament had faults enough, but it was sincere enough to be rhetorical. The Parliament ...
... of concessions and constitutional privileges but England could not allow the colonists equality: I do not mean equality with her, but even with ...
... crises since, it is the crowd that has found itself in the cart. But, of course, both the riot and repression in England were but shadows of the ...
... the monasteries were swept away and the mediaeval system of hospitality destroyed, tramps and beggars became a problem, the solution of which has ...
... between Charles and ourselves. And, above all, that revolution should be the first thing and the final thing in anything calling itself a popular ...
... had almost certainly come to Britain, not indeed otherwise than by the routes established by Rome, but certainly long before the official Roman ...
... even of legend. And rather than trust with entire simplicity to these it would be infinitely wiser to trust to legend of the loosest and most local ...
... least faintly tenable that there was nothing else to be seen. In any case when St. Augustine came to the largely barbarized land, with what may ...
... this episode also we must agree that we do not know yet we shall be quite out of touch with the time if we say that we do not care. The element of ...
... had poured into Italy, breaking the popular statues and denouncing the idolatry of the Pope, until routed, in a style sufficiently symbolic, by the ...
... has sometimes been Terror. The Frenchman especially is always a Revolutionist-and never an Anarchist. Now this effort of kings like Henry II. to ...
... factory. Like everything else in the mediaeval revolution, from its cathedrals to its ballads, it was as anonymous as it was enormous. It is admitted ...
... of to-day, the Charter of a Guild roughly corresponded to that recognition for which the railwaymen and other trades unionists asked some years ...