Cover of A Letter to the German Communists

A Letter to the German Communists

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1898

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 210
eBook size: 310Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Letter to the German Communists':

On 8th July 1917 Alexander Kerensky became the new leader of the Provisional Government. Kerensky was still the most popular man in the government because of his political past. In the Duma he had been leader of the moderate socialists and had been seen as the champion of the working-class. However Kerensky like George Lvov was unwilling to end the war. In fact soon after taking office he announced a new summer offensive. Soldiers on the Eastern Front were dismayed at the news and regiments began to refuse to move to the front line. There was a rapid increase in the number of men deserting and by the autumn of 1917 an estimated 2 million men had unofficially left the army. On 19th July Kerensky gave orders for the arrest of leading Bolsheviks who were campaigning against the war. This included Vladimir Lenin Gregory Zinoviev Lev Kamenev Anatoli Lunacharsky and Alexandra Kollontai. The Bolshevik headquarters at the Kshesinsky Palace was also occupied by government troops. Lenin now returned to Petrograd but remained in hiding. On 25th September Kerensky attempted to recover his left-wing support by forming a new coalition that included more Mensheviks and Socialist Revolutionaries. However with the Bolsheviks controlling the Soviets and now able to call on 25000 armed militia Kerenskys authority had been undermined. The Bolsheviks set up their headquarters in the Smolny Institute. The former girls convent school also housed the Petrograd Soviet. Under pressure from the nobility and industrialists Alexander Kerensky was persuaded to take decisive action. On 22nd October he ordered the arrest of the Military Revolutionary Committee. The next day he closed down the Bolshevik newspapers and cut off the telephones to the Smolny Institute. Leon Trotsky now urged the overthrow of the Provisional Government. Lenin agreed and on the evening of 24th October 1917 orders were given for the Bolsheviks began to occupy the railway stations the telephone exchange and the State Bank. The following day the Red Guards surrounded the Winter Palace. Inside was most of the countrys Cabinet although Kerensky had managed to escape from the city. The Winter Palace was defended by Cossacks some junior army officers and the Womans Battalion. At 9 p.m. the Aurora and the Peter and Paul Fortress began to open fire on the palace. Little damage was done but the action persuaded most of those defending the building to surrender. The Red Guards led by Vladimir Antonov-Ovseenko now entered the Winter Palace and arrested the Cabinet ministers.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Letter to the German Communists':


... A LETTER TO THE GERMAN COMMUNISTS     Dear comrades,     I had intended to state my view of ...
... pedantry and philistinism. The armed capitalists set traps for the unarmed workers they killed them wholesale, murdered their leaders, ambushing ...
... and supported by France, Britain and America. This hatred pushed them into premature insurrections.     That is why the development ...
... process of disintegration among the anarchists to go on and come to a head. Hardly anyone in Western Europe has experienced anything like a big revolution. ...
... Communist International, all the better. Firstly, they have saved us the trouble of expelling them. Secondly, it has now been demonstrated most conclusively ...
... Communist International, we must forget about him and devote all our attention, all our efforts, to peaceful, practical and constructive work (without ...
... small. Incomparably more important was the second reason, namely, that essentially much of Levi's criticism of the March action in Germany in 1921 was ...
... was absurd).     It is true that Levi did all he possibly could, and much besides, to weaken and spoil his criticism, and make it difficult ...
... sad cases, when even fine comrades have lost their heads. If the West-European comrades imagine that they are insured against such sad cases it is ...
... expulsion was justified and the wavering or hesitant workers will be given all the more forceful and convincing proof of the absolute correctness ...
... want to regard themselves as Communists.     I am informed that at the last meeting of the enlarged C.C. (Ausschuss ), even the Left-winger ...
... work, to determine concretely, taking account of the practical experience of the communist struggle already begun, exactly what the line of further activity ...
... perhaps, have been impossible. In the tactical amendments published in the newspaper Moskau [150] in German, French and English and signed by the German, ...
... defect, as has been proved by the course and outcome of the Third Congress. And precisely because we have become conscious of our defect we will rid ...
... carefully prepared battles. . . . ? ? The United Communist Party of Germany will be the better able to carry out mass action, the better it adapts ...
... surprise. But our forces are greater, immeasurably greater we are learning tactics and strategy we have advanced this science on the basis of the ...
... in the Third Congress resolution on the work of the Party. And we shall overcome this defect.     Comrades, German Communists, permit ...
... The Right wing of the party walked out of the Halle Congress and, under the old name, formed a separate party, which later, in September 1922, joined ...
... The paper played an important role in turning the Communist Party into a truly mass proletarian and revolutionary party, free from all kinds of opportunists. ...
... nazi dictatorship was set up, the paper was closed down but continued to appear illegally. From 1935 it was issued in Prague and from October 1936 to ...