Cover of A Child Of The Glens

A Child Of The Glens

Auhtor: Edward Newenham Hoare

Language: english
Published: 1875

Genres:

fiction and literature
Downloads: 354
eBook size: 399Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Child Of The Glens':

... downward, while the narrow valley itself is studded with trees and pretty homesteads. The people of The Glens are peculiar, primitive, and distinct. ...
... But, as it was quite evident that no such relationship as this could exist, so it came to be generally understood that there was no tie of blood ...
... four miles off, up on the open moorland. It was only in summer that the children could possibly attend, and even then their visits were infrequent ...
... hand a delicate-looking, white-haired, timid boy. Again and again he fancied himself walking sadly and dreamily on the pure smooth sand of the beautiful ...
... now far advanced, and the children were growing weary of their work. Several heaps of brown, wet, shining weed stood at intervals along the sands, as ...
... other response. Now, lass, look sharp and run up the brae, and call some of the men, or the tide will be in upon us. And we 'll lose the wrack, too, ...
... man seemed much cut up, probably owing to the doubts cast on his honesty. So sad was the fate of the unknown wanderer, and so great the interest excited, ...
... and mightn't be able to write for some time. There was a directed envelope inside, and I sent off a few lines to say the wains was well. After that ...
... the old woman's increasing infirmities. The child had even come, strangely enough, to think of and speak to the object of her dreams as mother. Was ...
... could be said against his character. He was steady, diligent, and submissive. And when he was placed in a position where he could earn something, he ...
... had now been settled on the moors about the headlands. The girl was happy in herself, and therefore failed not to inspire others with something of ...
... say nothing against his motives, only that I think he acted wrongly. Valuable time has been lost but clergymen are never good men of business, ...
... a somewhat haughty letter to the Rev. Cooper Smith, and an excessively gushing and almost affectionate one to Elsie. Both letters were shown to George ...
... Lady Eleanor. And the boy. said the clergyman. There was a pause. The Ladies Constance and Eleanor looked at each other, and then at their mother. I ...
... Jim. Please telegraph results obtained immediately. Reply paid for. The fool. muttered Mr. Smith and, yielding to a sudden irritation, he filled ...
... Elsie also wrote a line to say she was glad not to be a lady, and believed that he would get on all the better for not being a lord. Thus it came ...
... ties, whom we have long corresponded with, or are likely in the future to be much associated with, is always looked forward to with embarrassment and ...
... as the patient beasts let themselves slip down the gravelly path. It's early for tourists, thought Elsie, as she quietly walked on her way. The ...
... at the door. We shall gee you again the day after to-morrow, Sunday, said Lady Eleanor, as they prepared to start. We are going to Ashleigh Church, ...
... dependent. Fortunately enough a vacancy had recently occurred (by marriage) in the mistress-ship of a small school situated close to the gate of Burnham ...