Cover of A Narrative Of The Expedition To Dongola And Sennaar

A Narrative Of The Expedition To Dongola And Sennaar

Auhtor: George Bethune English

Language: english
Published: 1822

Genres:

non fiction
Downloads: 257
eBook size: 353Kb

Review by Daniel G. Lebryk, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Narrative Of The Expedition To Dongola And Sennaar':

George Bethune English (March 7 1787 - Washington D.C. September 20 1828) was an American adventurer diplomat soldier and convert to Islam. The oldest of four children English was born in Cambridge Massachusetts where he was baptized at Trinity Church on April 1 1787. He later attended Harvard College where his dissertation won a Bowdoin Prize he received a Masters in theology in 1811. During his studies however English encountered doubts about Christian theology and went on to publish his misgivings in a book entitled The Grounds of Christianity Examined which earned him excommunication from the Church of Christ in 1814. English addressed some of the criticisms and controversies caused by his first book in a second tract A Letter to the Reverend Mr. Cary as well as in published responses to Unitarian leader William Ellery Channings (1780?1842) Two Sermons on Infidelity. Subsequently he edited a country newspaper during which time he may have learned the Cherokee language. English was nominated by President James Madison on February 27 1815 and commissioned on March 1 1815 as a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps during the War of 1812 and assigned to Marine Corps headquarters. He then sailed to the Mediterranean and was among the first citizens of the United States known to have visited Egypt. Shortly after arriving in Egypt he resigned his commission converted to Islam and joined Ismail Pasha in an expedition up the Nile River against Sennar 1820 winning distinction as an officer of artillery. He published his Narrative of the Expedition to Dongola and Sennaar (London 1822) regarding his exploits. A colleague from Harvard Edward Everett published a rejoinder to Englishs book The Grounds of Christianity Examined to which English responded with his 1824 book Five Smooth Stones out of the Brook. After his work for Ismail Pasha English worked in the Diplomatic Corps of the United States in the Levant where he worked to secure a trade agreement between the United States and the Ottoman Empire which had trade valued at nearly 800000 in 1822. In 1827 he returned to the United States and died in Washington the next year.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Narrative Of The Expedition To Dongola And Sennaar':


... interesting, and hitherto imperfectly known to the civilized world. The Nile, on whose banks we have marched for so many hundred miles, is the most ...
... of the inhabitants some of these forts are to be seen surmounting the high rocky islands with which the Second Cataract abounds, and make a picturesque ...
... made to carry one person, which are very well contrived. Three or four large empty gourds are fastened firmly to a small oblong frame made out of ...
... that this country was watered by two ranges of water-wheels one range on the bank of the river, which threw the water of the Nile into small canals ...
... They informed us that there was a town called Dongola, containing about three hundred houses, at the distance of two days' sail from this place, and ...
... all in the boats, and I regretted that my being in similar circumstances put it out of my power to ameliorate their situation. As, however, we had now ...
... hundred with the army, but none of his cannon. The enemy advanced to the combat with loud screams and cries, and with great fury. The Abbadies could not ...
... passed the rapids. No military movements took place, except detaching the Divan Effendi with four hundred cavalry, to join the detachment already in Berber, ...
... and outside of the fertile land lying between the river and the desert of consequence we were rarely led to its banks so as to ascertain its course and ...
... names, and among other terms, a pimp. Upon this, I checked the soldier, telling him that this man was a considerable personage in his country, ...
... is a very tall and very large man, about sixty years of age. Two days after, having occasion to go to the other side of the river, I found Nousreddin ...
... The Nile of Bruce must, therefore, after the expedition of Ismael Pasha, be considered as a branch of a great and unexplored river, which ...
... Cogia Achmet with thirteen hundred cavalry and three pieces of artillery to the upper country of Sennaar between the Bahar el Abiud and the Nile to ...
... of the sun, which pla they consider it as ane to look at. The prisoners brought in by Cogia Achmet resembled in their dress the savages of America ...
... Kandessee, in a small island adjoining which Khalil Aga, my companion, says he saw, when he ascended the third cataract,[70] a pyramid more modern ...
... soundly as possible. During the course of last night we fell in with a caravan coming from Assuan we pressed round them to buy something to eat we ...
... as these people are so adroit in the management of their shields that they parried every stroke. I have seen upon the field where this battle was ...
... pillaging all the countries around your own. They replied, that they had no other means to live. The Pasha answered, cultivate your land, and live ...
... this, the Pasha sent Cogia Achmet, one of the roughest of his chiefs, with thirteen hundred cavalry, escorting three, brazen-faced lawyers, out of the ...
... money that he would take as a reward for what he had done that he would receive no reward for it but from the hands of God, who would pay more for it ...