Cover of A Maker Of History

A Maker Of History

Auhtor: E Phillips Oppenheim

Language: english
Published: 1905

Genres:

pulp,  romance
Downloads: 131
eBook size: 305Kb

Review by A. Dent, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Maker Of History':

A Maker Of History by E Phillips Oppenheim. Explains the Russian Baltic fleet s attack on the North Sea fishing fleet. A Maker of History records how thousands of German immigrants had been acting as pre-invasion intelligence-gatherers ensuring that the German Army knew almost to a bale of hay what provender lay between London and the coast . As Captain X the head of German intelligence in London explained to Oppenheim There are in this country 290 000 young countrymen of yours and of mine who have served their time and who can shoot ... Clerks waiters and hairdressers ... each have their work assigned to them. The forts which guard this great city may be impregnable from without but from within -- that is another matter . A Maker of History includes the police of three countries among its personages to say nothing of Ambassadors clever Secretaries and high officials and a mysterious disappearance and a missing sheet of manuscript keep the entire company in movement. The scene shifts from Germany and Russian to France and England and the author as is his way gives the reader to understand that he is receiving valuable information as to the manner in which the world is governed.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Maker Of History':


... friends. Presently they rose, and came across the room with her. Guy stood up and bowed. The introductions were informal, but he felt his insular prejudices ...
... might do worse, he answered but in any case, Miss Poynton, I do hope that you will send over for some friend or relation to keep ...
... misfortune had not come on just when it did I should have gone with them, and even up to the last we hoped that I might be able to go to Paris with Phyllis.. Duncombe ...
... the plucking. But Madame, who sat beside her, frowned upon them both. She had seen things which had puzzled her. She signed to them to wait. She ...
... At a small desk within a few feet of him a middle-aged woman with a cold, hard face sat with a book of account before her and a pile of bills. There ...
... by speaking. You will have to leave Paris, and very soon. It is so easily to be managed. A dispute at cards here-you would certainly be in the wrong, ...
... ever ask her to marry you.. I don't know, George. I'm poor, and I'm twelve years older than she is. I don't know.. There was another silence. ...
... you think that you would be interested. she asked. You know that I should, he answered quietly. For a time he shot badly. Then he felt ...
... that he will find her.. The windows were wide open, and both men suddenly turned round. There was no mistaking the sound which came to them from ...
... sure of it, Pelham answered. One more question, Spencer added, intervening. But the question remained unasked. The butler had opened the dining-room ...
... and a dark skirt. Everything, from the ornaments at her neck, the dull metal waistband, and the trim shoes, seemed to him to be carefully chosen, ...
... little to satisfy your curiosity. Permit me to explain my errand in a few words.. Certainly, Duncombe interrupted. But won't you take something. ...
... le Duc here has hinted at some slight indiscretion of yours on the night of your arrival in Paris. I have some influence with the Government here, ...
... bowed low with exaggerated grace, and kissed the tips of her fingers. I. he answered. And-for this time with a perfectly legitimate reason ...
... understand anything clearly, but you see that I trust you. I will not see him.. Mademoiselle is very wise, he answered. Indeed, it is better not. ...
... like our Colonies, but no one will believe that she has the courage to strike a blow for them. I will tell you what I believe, Duncombe. I believe that ...
... me. I don't believe, however, that you have gone to all this trouble without some ulterior motive. What is it. What can I offer you in exchange for these ...
... at it for a moment, and handed it back. It is certainly the one, he answered. If you look at the back you will see my initials there and the ...
... You will be always accessible.. I shall not leave my post, Prince. Monsieur Grisson answered. You will find me here at any time. . Chapter ...
... with a laugh. Back into the world, George, where dreams are only the cobwebs of time, and a man's work grows beneath his hands like a living statue ...