Cover of The Miser Married

The Miser Married

Auhtor: Catherine Hutton

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 386
eBook size: 551Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'The Miser Married':

Sir Martin Marr-all by John Dryden.--The mistake by Sir John Vanbrugh.--The plain dealer by William Wycherley.--The mock doctor by Henry Fielding.--The miser by Henry Fielding.--The non-juror by Colley Cibber.

Excerpts from the Book 'The Miser Married':


... moment. But, checking himself, he said, May I credit you, Miss Mowbray? How monstrous, exclaimed I! Does any body doubt Miss Mowbray? If I ...
... Maddam Mereveal, seeing how kindly she behafed to him, wen he brok his leg but you knos thare has never bin the day, never since he left, that ever ...
... cook and wait upon a lady! Or, suppose the lady was to bring her own maid with her, its morally impossable for Martha to do all the rest? Or, suppose ...
... to doubt, that God was Almighty in the second, that he was Benevolent in the third, Charitable in the fourth, Divine, and so on. When he came ...
... so reasonable a manner, that they cannot but be pleased with their duty. I dwell with some pleasure on this subject, because I have seen favourite ...
... would not leave a white place upon your delicate skin. Well, said my mother, cheap as words are, I think you have had two hundred and fifty ...
... insist upon my treating him with respect. Miss Montgomery is a very tenacious disputant, said my mother. If one hunts her out of one argument ...
... honour to make me a visit, you must allow me to return it by Miss Montgomery and Miss Mowbray, who ride on horseback for, at present, I have no carriage ...
... I hope it will not go out of my own family! I hope it will go either with, or to, the venerable old castle and domain, in which my ancestors maintained ...
... money, insists upon keeping a carriage, and one, poor, pair of horses and visiting her neighbours! For these mighty transgressions you have been chiding ...
... I will help Mr. Winterdale to a slice of venison. When Henry asked Mrs. Elrington to take a glass of wine, and she named port, he said, I wonder ...
... the bite. Nor is Mr. Sharp more discomposed on account of Henry. His optics do not discern Henry's attachment, and he still considers Eleanor as ...
... that I was responsible to the master of every inn, and to every servant who drank a can of beer in his kitchen. Allow me to say, then, ...
... his sanction for coming hither. Then wherefore are you come? To persuade you to be mine and then let fortune do her worst. ...
... Sir, I must say you are the very obligingest gentleman in all the world. I must confess I am quite anxious to know because it may happen that I ...
... and still be rich. Mr. Winterdale having rendered me these services, left Mendall to transact some business in town stepped into the mail ...
... is my cousin, the amiable wife of Henry! After pleasing her husband, her first wish is to please his father and, sweetly tempered by nature, and ...
... and that the two girls are very beautiful. So they may be for me. I had a glance of two female figures, peeping through the lattice of the little ...
... he shun society himself, asked my cousin? or does every body fly from him? Both, replied Mrs. Thacker. He won't let any body enter his gates, ...
... wood and so, I doubt not, had she but he struck off into a different road, and deferred his enquiries whether we had suffered from our fright, till ...