Cover of A Virginia Girl In The First Year Of The War

A Virginia Girl In The First Year Of The War

Auhtor: C Harrison

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 161
eBook size: 269Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Virginia Girl In The First Year Of The War':

Albert Harrison Hoyt (1826?1915) was an American editor and author born in Sandwich New Hampshire. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1850 studied and practiced law in Portsmouth New Hampshire was a paymaster in the army during the Civil War rising to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. After the peace he was editor of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register (1868?76) and of Memorial Biographies

Excerpts from the Book 'A Virginia Girl In The First Year Of The War':


... The idea was preposterous. But when evening came again, and with it the hour when the colored people (who in summer and autumn weather kept astir ...
... we enjoyed the usual holiday gathering of kinsfolk in the usual fashion. The old Vaucluse house, known for many years past as the center ...
... near the army, a few miles distant. By this time all our kith and kin of fighting age had joined the volunteers. One cannot picture accommodations ...
... high hope to the scene of coming conflict. Such shouts as went up from sturdy throats when the locomotive moved on after the last stop before Manassas, ...
... up a single, very dirty soldier with his arm in a sling. What a heaven-send he was, if only as an escape-valve for our pent-up sympathies! We seized ...
... We were glad enough to turn away and gallop homeward. With August heats and lack of water, Bristoe was forsaken for quarters near Culpeper, ...
... evening, which afterwards had a great vogue, were one beginning By blue Patapsco's billowy dash, arranged by us to an air from Puritani, and shouted ...
... and sorrows of those at large in the Confederacy. The first winter of the war was spent by our family in Richmond, where we found lodgings ...
... boxes of sardines, French prunes, and bags of biscuit, while the hosts contributed only a roast turkey or a ham, with knives and forks. Democratic feasts ...
... from the pavement by a garden full of bounteous greenery, where it was easy to forget the discomforts of our previous mode of life. I shall not attempt ...
... and although his nicety of dress, after the pattern of the boulevardier fini of Paris, was the subject of much wonderment to the populace when ...
... sudden rise of the river, occasioned by a tremendous thunder-storm. In face of recent reverses, we in Richmond had begun to feel like the prisoner ...
... anguish of apprehension. There was enough to do now in preparation for the wounded yet, as events proved, all that was done was not enough by half. Night ...
... missed that was mercy gained. To supply food for the hospitals the contents of larders all over town were emptied into baskets while cellars ...
... exhaustion, palm-leaf fans in hand, a friend persuaded us to ascend to the small platform on the summit of the Capitol, in search of fresher ...
... were enameled with wild flowers, and the thickets were full of May-blossom and dogwood. Mounting to the summit of the bluff, one may sit under the ...
... army, and at the first tidings of sound of a gun, anywhere within reach of Richmond, he was in the saddle and off for the spot - to the dismay of his staff-officers, ...
... - the general regarding him now with glances of growing severity. After a painful pause the President said, with a voice of deprecation: ...
... for many of the dead there was mourning by all the town. No incident of the war, for instance, made a deeper impression than the fall in battle of Colonel ...
... more<