Cover of A Fountain Sealed

A Fountain Sealed

Auhtor: Anne Douglas Sedgwick

Language: english
Published: 1907

Genres:

fiction and literature
Downloads: 410
eBook size: 518Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Fountain Sealed':

Anne Douglas Sedgwick (March 28 1873 - July 19 1935) was an American-born British writer. The daughter of a businessman she was born in Englewood New Jersey but at age nine her family moved to London. Although she made return visits to the United States she lived in England for the remainder of her life. In 1908 she married the British essayist and journalist Basil de Slincourt. During World War I she and her husband were volunteer workers in hospitals and orphanages in France. Her novels explored the contrast in values between Americans and Europeans. He bestsellin novel Tante was made into a 1918 film The Impossible Woman and The Little French Girl into a 1925 film of the same name. In 1931 she was elected to the United States National Institute of Arts and Letters. Four of her books were on the list of bestselling novels in the United States for 1912 1924 1927 and 1929 as determined by the New York Times. Anne Douglas Sedgwick died in Hampstead

Excerpts from the Book 'A Fountain Sealed':


... her skin, her eyes, bright and unfatigued, suggested nothing less than a widow plunged in remorseful grief. Her eyes, indeed, were thoughtful, her lips, ...
... her boy in a few days and that they would sail for New York together. Not directly, she answered. Before very long, she hoped. So many things depended ...
... that he was barely conscious of the little tremor of amusement that went through him for the triteness of her speech. Such triteness was beautiful when ...
... very little money, Imogen.. Imogen, her hands lightly folded in her lap, sat across the table, all mild attention. No, I didn't, mama. We never ...
... are disciplined and harmonized into a larger experience. There has been music to keep up friends to see and to make things nice for flowers to send ...
... flat not very far away in Washington Square. The retrenchments in the Upton household had taken place and Mary found her friend putting her shoulder ...
... so young when, measured beside his own contrasted youth, he felt how old she was. It was pathetic that eyes so clear should fade, that a cheek so rounded ...
... longer looked up Imogen knew that by the fact that when, metaphorically, her eyes were cast down to meet with approbation and sweet encouragement his ...
... my chlamys a darling. said Valerie happily from below, where she knelt to turn a hem. Mama won't let us forget that chlamys, Imogen said, casting ...
... soon. So soon for what.. Imogen, at this, allowed her badly adjusted mask of lightness to fall and a sudden solemnity overspread her features. Don't ...
... landscape, all wind and vigor and discipline, were suddenly transformed to this,- Imogen looked about her at the limpid day,-to soft yielding, ...
... may come to, for mama's pictures of me are not likely to be accurate, said Imogen mildly. We don't think in the same way or see things in the same ...
... the other quite dreadfully well-mannered, sipping her tea, arching her brows and assuming all sorts of perilous elegancies of pronunciation that Imogen ...
... she might fall before him. And indeed she would have cast herself face downward on the grass had he not been there and she leaned forward on his supporting ...
... re-enter, through sane, kind altruism, his old, normal state of consciousness, and to shut the door on something very sweet and wonderful, to shut the ...
... they might elude the others yet. But, as they approached the veranda, she found that Jack was beside them. Neither Valerie nor Miss Bocock cared to ...
... of difficulties. Do try some of our pop-overs, Miss Bocock it's a national dish.. What are you going to do this morning, Imogen. Jack asked, ...
... like a virgin saint bent on some wild errand through the night, an errand brought to a proud pause, in which was no fear and no hesitancy, as her path ...
... the day had conquered it. And how dear, how noble of her lover to show, so unfalteringly, his loyalty to the past. It was with a sigh made up of ...
... her hands, look round her with a slight amaze at the changed season where she found herself, and, after the soundless pause of recognition, ...