Cover of A Dutch Boy Fifty Years After

A Dutch Boy Fifty Years After

Auhtor: Edward Bok

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 414
eBook size: 452Kb

Review by Chandler, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Dutch Boy Fifty Years After':

Alfred Edward Housman (26 March 1859 ? 30 April 1936) usually known as A. E. Housman was an English classical scholar and poet best known to the general public for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. Lyrical and almost epigrammatic in form the poems were mostly written before 1900. Their wistful evocation of doomed youth in the English countryside in spare language and distinctive imagery appealed strongly to late Victorian and Edwardian taste and to many early twentieth century English composers both before and after the First World War. Through its song-setting the poetry became closely associated with that era and with Shropshire itself. Housman was counted one of the foremost classicists of his age and has been ranked as one of the greatest scholars of all time. He established his reputation publishing as a private scholar and on the strength and quality of his work was appointed Professor of Latin at University College London and later at Cambridge. His editions of Juvenal Manilius and Lucan are still considered authoritative.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Dutch Boy Fifty Years After':


... the next morning he received a rebuke, and was informed that his chances with the paper were over. The ready acknowledgment and evident regret of the ...
... plan of furnishing the same article to a group of newspapers, one in each city, for simultaneous publication. He looked over the ground, and found ...
... the conclusion, on looking over the newspapers, that the absence of any distinctive material for women was a factor. He talked the matter over with ...
... in a newsy, readable New York literary letter, and he prevailed upon the editor of the New York Star to allow him to supplement the book reviews ...
... other single argument, this last point destroyed Bok's faith in the judgment of his friends. He had had experience enough to realize that a man could ...
... ask for, although it thinks it does at the time. But woe to the editor and his periodical if he heeds that siren voice! The editor has, therefore, ...
... the matter a second thought, and went out and borrowed more money to meet his pay-roll. With all respect to American publishers, there are very ...
... tens of thousands of plans sold, not a purchaser ever noticed the absence of a parlor except one woman in Brookline, Mass., who, in erecting a group ...
... in both countries. He had for years toiled unceasingly to reach this point: he felt he had now achieved at least one goal. He had now turned ...
... I am hunting? Oh, no. I mean as President. No, replied the smiling President. I'll tell you, Curtis I'm too busy to think about ...
... galore he knew them! And he had no wish to introduce the type into his home life. Mrs. Bok, however, ably seconded Josef Hofmann, and endeavored ...
... Yet not a hint of the impending events had reached the public. The Germans were being beaten back, that was known it was evident that the morale ...
... life. My family had come from a land (the Netherlands) noted for its thrift but we had been in the United States only a few days before the realization ...
... loaded with the garbage of Brooklyn householders being towed through New York harbor out to sea, it was an easy calculation that what was thrown away ...
... Home Journal, 103-107 building up a magazine, 113-123 visit to Oxford, 124-127 adventures in art and civics, 134-146 adventures ...
... regrets to-day that he did not have more time in his boyhood for play. Like most boys, Edward wanted a little money now and then for spending, ...
... was to stand him in such practical stead in later years. It was not easy for the parents to see their boys thus forced to do work which only a ...
... young reporter no trouble. But alas for his stenographic knowledge, when President Hayes began to speak! Edward worked hard, but the President was too ...
... think it would keep you busy if you did this for every one who asked you. Well, said the poet, you see, I am not so busy a man as I was ...
... in the room. Suddenly the boy heard Miss Alcott say: Have you read this new book by Ruskin yet? Slowly the great master of thought ...