Cover of A Continuation Of A Voyage To New Holland

A Continuation Of A Voyage To New Holland

Auhtor: William Dampier

Language: english
Published: 1729

Genres:

travel
Downloads: 115
eBook size: 317Kb

Review by Dr. Bojan Tunguz, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Continuation Of A Voyage To New Holland':

A Continuation Of A Voyage To New Holland by William Dampier. A Continuation of a Voyage to New Holland is presented here in a high quality kindle edition. This popular classic work by William Dampier is in the English language and may not include graphics or images from the original edition. If you enjoy the works of William Dampier then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Continuation Of A Voyage To New Holland':


... to reach from the equator itself (within a degree) to the Tropic of Capricorn, and beyond it that in coasting round it, which I designed by this voyage, ...
... found many branches of the lake entering within the mangrove land but not beyond it. Of these we left some on the right hand and some on the left, still ...
... from thence, came to the sandy bay just against the ship where they stayed all night, and made good fires. They were armed with lances, swords and ...
... on the north side of Timor to the eastward as well to seek for water, as also to acquaint myself with the island, and to search for the Portuguese ...
... my pitch was almost spent which was all owing to the carpenter's wilful waste and ignorance so that I had nothing to lay on upon the ship's ...
... south-west. The middle of it lies in about 9 degrees south latitude. It has no navigable rivers nor many harbours but abundance of bays for ships to ...
... the cotton-trees are not large, but tougher than those in America: here are also locust-trees of 2 or 3 sorts, bearing fruit, but not like those I have ...
... the ground to that height but from thence it went tapering smaller and smaller to the top, where it was no bigger than a man's leg, ending in a stump: ...
... this in sight was much too far off for them. We found variation 1 degree 2 minutes east. In the afternoon I steered north-east by east for the islands ...
... So soon as we anchored we sent the pinnace to look for water, and try if they could catch any fish. Afterwards we sent the yawl another way to ...
... bought a slave but they would not barter for anything but calicos, which I had not. Their houses on this side were very small, and seemed only to be ...
... any other danger before we came nigh it. For here might have been more islands not laid down in my charts besides this. For I searched all the charts ...
... on we stood off to sea and, having but little wind all night, were driven away to the north-west. We saw many great fires on the flat island. These ...
... it was loaded with round and partridge-shot the last dropped in the water somewhat short of them, but the round shot went between both boats and ...
... westward of the burning island, and the funnel of it lying on the south side, we could not discern the fire there as we did the smoke in the day when ...
... CONCERNING A NEW PASSAGE SOUTHWARD. By an observation the 13th at noon I found myself 25 minutes to the northward of my reckoning whether ...
... About 7 or 8 leagues to the west of us we saw a high round peaked mountain, from whose top a smoke seemed to ascend as from a volcano. There were 3 ...
... into the bay where we first watered, because of the currents which there whirl about very strangely, especially at spring tides which were now setting ...
... of me, returned. Something likewise to this purpose Mr. Merry, commander of the Fleet frigate, told me at my first arrival here and that the general ...
... land-crabs, men-of-war-birds and boobies good food and the air was here exceeding wholesome. AND ARE BROUGHT BACK TO ENGLAND. About a week after ...