Cover of Abbeychurch

Abbeychurch

Auhtor: Charlotte Mary Yonge

Language: english
Published: 1872

Genres:

fiction and literature
Downloads: 453
eBook size: 194Kb

Review by A. Dent, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Abbeychurch':

To learn more about how to self development through self control

Excerpts from the Book 'Abbeychurch':


... in order to put the finishing touches to a drawing, with which she had been engaged during the greater part of the morning. She had not been long ...
... he delighting in her gentleness, and she in his high daring spirit. Edward and Winifred are scarcely companions to her yet, so that she is forced to turn ...
... chimney.'. 'That being, I suppose, the only record he has left behind him,' said Anne. 'The only one now existing,' said Elizabeth, 'since ...
... Saxons, which she intended to present as a cushion for one of the chairs of St. Austin's Church.'. 'Oh. dreadful.' cried Anne. 'Papa walked up and ...
... have you been all this time.' said she to Elizabeth, while she caught hold of Winifred's hand, or, more properly speaking, of her wrist 'we shall all ...
... but Papa said that if one dined all must, and there would be too many.'. 'Oh, law. Kate,' said Harriet, 'never mind I do not mind it a bit, I would ...
... you mean when you set up your bristles, and I do. Besides, I was sorry for Lucy, who looks as if she had sensitiveness enough for the whole family.'. 'Poor ...
... during the walk to St. Austin's, as her daughter, Miss Wilhelmina, had engaged to teach Harriet to make wax flowers. Lucy was up-stairs, writing to Major ...
... very amusing. There was much of Coriolanus' indomitable pride and horror of mob popularity when he offended Beaufort and his kingdom in the halles, when, ...
... touchy Helen is this evening.' thought Elizabeth 'I had better let her alone, both for her sake and my own.'. 'How foolish I was to interfere.' thought ...
... of you. And how did he look, poor little fellow, and what did he say, and was not he delighted to see you.'. 'I shall leave you to judge of that,' ...
... were going down again, when Katherine, seeing Elizabeth go towards the kitchen stairs, exclaimed, 'Well, I will go no further it is so ridiculous, ...
... was writing her answer to Fanny's letter and by the time she had finished, had brought her into that agreeable frame, which is disposed to be offended ...
... to wish to gratify personal resentment.'. 'The frock does not make the friar,' said Rupert, 'and this may have been a bad palmer. Think of the Knights ...
... not think Helen quite the heroine of the story.'. 'I think Helen very much improved in appearance and manners,' said Sir Edward 'and I am quite willing ...
... bestowed on them, yet she was now convinced that Elizabeth was not absolutely determined to depreciate every performance of hers, and that she ...
... should not have thought a person with four sisters need complain of having to learn alone,' said her aunt. 'No more should I,' said Helen ...
... what is any small advantage to my own character compared with the injury I have done.' said Elizabeth 'I have made it appear as if you had ...
... must make everyone very happy who has anything to do with your Papa, and Aunt Mildred it has been a great treat to be with you all again, and to ...
... had been the means of her going to an officers' ball, at Hull, and whom she had danced with-'. 'Capital, capital.' cried Rupert 'I never heard all ...