Cover of A Collection Of Old English Plays Vol Iv

A Collection Of Old English Plays Vol Iv

Auhtor: A Bullen

Language: english

Genres:

drama
Downloads: 283
eBook size: 255Kb

Review by M. Erb, November 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Collection Of Old English Plays Vol Iv':

A Collection Of Old English Plays Vol Iv by Editor A H Bullen. A Collection of Old English Plays vol. 4 is edited by A E Bullen. Besides the plays there is an excellent introduction to the plays. The plays in this collection are Two Tragedies in One. By Robert Yarington The Captives or the Lost Recovered. By Thomas Heywood The Costlie Whore and Everie Woman in her Humor.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Collection Of Old English Plays Vol Iv':


... in the Warning orTwo Tragedies but I am not sure that Arden contains another scene which can be definitely pronounced to be beyond Yarington's ability, ...
... Tush, one for love, the other for reward, Will never tell the world my close intent. My conscience saith it is a damned deede To traine one foorth, ...
... and many pretie things For which, kind cooze, I rest your true debtor, And one day I will make you recompence. Fall. I, with thy lands and goods ...
... But since he hath conceal'd the thing thus long, I hope in God he will conceale it still. Rach. Pray God he do, and then I have no doubt But God will ...
... and twenty scud about the fields, That glads my hart to ze their iollitie. Vesu. This is the man, conferring of his Lambes, That slew a Lambe worth ...
... from the sides of Innocents. Cove. I will entice the greedie-minded soule, To pull the fruite from the forbidden tree YetTantalllike, he shall ...
... empty stomakes go unsupt to bed. 2nd Fish And so it often happens. 1 Fish See the cordaige Be stronge and tight, the ts with all theire stringes, ...
... Well advys'd: What can thy false toonge pleide in thy excuse, Thou volume of all vyces. Mild. Why, what not. Raph. Is thy hart sear'd, thy ...
... to bee myne, Oh merher [mirror] of thy sex, my Myrable. Pal. This surplusadge of joy should not bee forged. Ashb. No more than these noates are ...
... mee I have no end of Joy. Ash. This is my Mirable, My doughter and freeborne and if you still Persist the same man you profest your self, Beehold shee ...
... over man's yeelding heart Be lesse condemned. Oh, you were made for man, And living without man to murder men. If any creature be so fortunate That lives ...
... Pray, what is it, love. Con. Tis love indeed to thee, but to my heart Every loose sentence is a killing dart. I brought this _Gyges_[175] ...
... sudden feare, by palenesse, was displai'd Upon her rosie cheeke the crimson blood, That like a robe of state did beautifie The goodly buildings with ...
... To intreate a Rodophe, I had rather dye Then have my life lodg'd in such infamy: If all my fortunes on her words depend, Let her say kill me, and ...
... my Stars then. Grac. I should wrong am then, as thou dost with a false inditment. I know it took not beeing at thy birth: thou hast been merrie, ...
... lift up that beame. In th'one[252] scale put the worth of Lentulus, His state, his honors, and his revenewes Against that heavy waite put povertie, ...
... ye Gosip, hee's eene as kinde an animall, he would not wrong them y'faith. Citty wife. Tush, feare nothing woman, I hope to make him so again. Alacke, ...
... Not till I returne, pardon me. [Exit. Hostis. By my troth Gossip, I am halfe sick of a conceit. Citty wife. What, woman. passion of my ...
... Fair was held the next day. [9] A famous tavern in Thames Street. [10] Proposal. [11] Nares supposed that the expression fear no colours ...
... line is scored through in the MS. [76] The words Some faggotts . cloathes are scored through in the MS. [77] Monthes mind = strong desire. [78] ...