Cover of A Bid For Fortune

A Bid For Fortune

Auhtor: Guy Newell Boothby

Language: english
Published: 1895

Genres:

mysterydetective,  pulp
Downloads: 339
eBook size: 263Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Bid For Fortune':

Belle-Belle ou Le Chevalier Fortune is a French literary fairy tale written by Madame dAulnoy.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Bid For Fortune':


... whether it was true, as Miss Joyce, a subordinate, had been heard to declare, that the manager had once shown himself partial to a certain widow ...
... of the sort, turned up trumps, giving me as my share the nice round sum of ?5,000. With all this wealth at my back, and having been in harness for a ...
... last, just as eight bells was striking (twelve o'clock), I went below to my cabin. My fellow-passenger was fast asleep-a fact which I was grateful for ...
... when we think we have safely combated every other self-conceit. Well, Mr. Hatteras, I am very pleased to have made your acquaintance. Somehow I think ...
... he opened. It proved to be claret, and he poured out a glassful for me. As I was not prepared for so much liberality, I thought something must ...
... home alive.. You have had a very narrow escape, I answered, but thank goodness you're none the worse for it. Now, what's the best thing to be done. ...
... of the continuous tramp-like life she had led, lay well out in the stream. Having chartered a waterman, we were put on board, and I had the satisfaction ...
... few business friends I had made in London, and in the evening I went for the last time to a theatre. Five minutes to eleven o'clock next morning found ...
... bed this morning I felt as well as possible. Then Mr. Baxter was kind enough to bring me a cup of coffee, and within five minutes of drinking it, I was ...
... The pedestrian, whoever he might be, was approaching from the right hand, and, what was still more important, my trained ear informed me that he was ...
... we awaited the first signs of breaking day. Directly it was light I took off and unravelled one of my socks. The thread thus obtained I doubled, and ...
... to be free of you in my own house. Flesh and blood won't stand it, I tell you, sir-won't stand it. You pursued my daughter to England in a most ungentlemanly ...
... Inspector. Good-evening, said Mr. Wetherell. You have come from Government House, I presume.. Exactly so, sir, replied the Inspector. His ...
... he orders a nobbler of rum for me and a nobbler of whisky for 'imself. And when it was brought we sat talkin' of the place he'd thought o' takin' ...
... taken from some ship in the harbour, and-By Jove. here's another discovery.. What now. he cried, being by this time almost as excited as I was ...
... whose furniture van it was.. Yes. I remember reading the name as it turned round. Goddard & James, George Street. I wondered if the tenant ...
... Mist barque. Go aboard her, and take your money down into the cuddy. There you'll get your answer.. Nothing more. cried Mr. Wetherell. That's ...
... dining-room without paying any attention to his threats. Both Mr. Wetherell and Beckenham had been witnesses of what had occurred, and now they questioned ...
... think. asked the skipper, who very properly wished to run no risk with his owner's boat. Mostly coral. None too good, perhaps, but as we shall have ...
... ball. Very good. Well, you must know that when I arrived at Government House I met Mrs. Mayford-the lady who had promised to chaperone me-in the cloak-room, ...