Cover of A Countess From Canada

A Countess From Canada

Auhtor: Bessie Marchant

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 403
eBook size: 570Kb

Review by Dr. Bojan Tunguz, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Countess From Canada':

A Countess From Canada by Bessie Marchant. Beyond the Second Portage Oh dear how I should love to go out Katherine Radford stretched her arms wearily above her head as she spoke. There had been five days of persistent snowfall but this morning the clouds had broken showing strips and patches of blue sky and there was bright sunshine flooding the world again with hard and sparkling frost. Why don t you go demanded Phil who was the youngest. Miles and me don t mind having a holiday at all. Speak for yourself if you like growled Miles who was thirteen but I want to get this schooling business over and done with so that I can start doing something useful. And speak grammatically please or else keep silent. You should have said Miles and I remarked Katherine with quite crushing dignity as she turned from the window to take her place at the table once more. Phil thrust his tongue in his cheek after the manner beloved of small boys and subsided into silence and an abstracted study of his spelling book. The schoolroom was a small chamber partitioned off from the store by a wall of boards so thin that all conversation about buying and selling with the gossip of the countryside thrown in was plainly audible to the pupils whose studies suffered in consequence. The stovepipe from the store went through this room keeping it comfortably warm and in winter Duke Radford and the boys slept there because it was so terribly cold in the loft. Katherine had come home from college in July determined to teach school all winter and to make a success of it too in a most unpromising part of the world. But even the most enthusiastic teacher must fail to get on if there are no scholars to teach and at present she had only Miles and Phil her two brothers as pupils. This was most trying to Katherine s patience for of course if there had only been pupils enough she could have had a properly constituted school and a salary also. She might even have had a regular schoolhouse to teach in instead of being compelled to use a makeshift such as this. But everything must have a beginning and so she had worked on bravely through the autumn hoping against hope for more pupils. In the intervals between teaching the boys she kept the books for her father and even attended to the wants of an occasional customer when Duke Radford was busy or absent. The store at Roaring Water Portage was awkwardly placed for business. It stood on a high bank overlooking the rapids and when it was built five years before had been the centre of a mining village. But the mining village had been abandoned for three years now because the vein of copper had ended in a thick seam of coal which under present circumstances was not worth working. Now the nearest approach to a village was at Seal Cove at the mouth of the river nearly three miles away where there were about half a dozen wooden huts and the liquor saloon kept by Oily Dave when he was at home and shut up when he was absent on fishing expeditions. Although houses were so scarce there was no lack of trade for the lonely store in the woods. All through the summer there was a procession of birchbark canoes filled with red men and white coming down the river to the bay laden with skins of wolf fox beaver wolverine squirrel and skunk the harvest of the winter s trapping. Then in winter the cove and the river were often crowded with boats driven to anchorage there by the ice and to escape the fearful storms sweeping over the bay. The river was more favoured as an anchorage than the cove because it was more sheltered and also because there was open water at the foot of the rapids even in the severest winter and had been so long as anyone could remember. As the morning wore on Katherine s mood became even more restless and she simply yearned for the fresh air and the sunshine. She was usually free to go out-of-doors in the afternoons because the boys only worked until noon

Excerpts from the Book 'A Countess From Canada':


... the portage within a week. Oh, don't talk of next winter, Father we have not got rid of this one yet! exclaimed Mrs. Burton, who was entirely ...
... the steps and fetched the tin of tomatoes from the top shelf. Ah, there are a good many things that get left undone for want of time and money! ...
... him, Mary said in a low tone and Mr. Selincourt nodded in reply, as the boats drew in to the landing by the fish shed, and Oily Dave came hurrying ...
... If only the river had not flowed between, Mary might have gone to her assistance. As it was, she stood watching the bowed figure go slowly up the portage ...
... will bring you tea. Yes, he answered languidly, while she flew to get things ready, and called one of the men to assist her in putting water ...
... not so nearly cleared out as you would think, Miles answered, in a confidential tone. We always like the shelves to look thin at this time of the ...
... the summer there was a procession of birchbark canoes, filled with red men and white, coming down the river to the bay, laden with skins of wolf, ...
... supper possessed. She had to talk, however, and to seem cheerful, yet all the time she was shrinking and shivering because of this mysterious mood displayed ...
... make sure of interest and amusement when I have two feet available for service, but I was not cut out for the peaceful avocation of the couch invalid, ...
... and for that I have been sorry ever since, which shows the contrary-mindedness of women, don't you think? Katherine nodded speak she could ...
... Katherine quickly she had seen that Mrs. Burton was about to speak, and was anxious that Phil should have first chance. But the boy was half-asleep, ...
... measuring calico in a great hurry only, as she had turned her work round, and was doing it all over again, it was rather wasted labour. A thought ...
... and was looking about him as if scarcely able to believe the evidence of his own eyes. Well, if it don't beat everything! he exclaimed, then ...
... may chance to be? Of course not why should it? she asked, her glance meeting his now in surprise at his earnestness. Their progress ...
... which had filtered through into the solitudes from the great world outside. They are saying that the Mr. Selincourt who has bought the fishing fleet ...
... and probably they were caught in a snowstorm and died in their sleep, said Katherine. In that case what had become of the mail bags and ...
... because I was so horribly afraid you would want to draw back, he admitted candidly, and I wanted you so badly that I could not afford to take the ...
... angry, I think, broke in Miles. You ordered those two round just as if you had been a duchess, and they simply squirmed before you, like the worms ...
... For a few days 'Duke Radford appeared to get better with astonishing rapidity. He left his bed, and crept across the store, to sit in the rocking-chair ...
... and preparing to slit open the envelope in her hand. Still, he might rather that his letter waited for him unopened, murmured Katherine but ...