Cover of A History Of Science Vol 4

A History Of Science Vol 4

Auhtor: Henry Smith Williams

Language: english

Genres:

science,  history
Downloads: 320
eBook size: 493Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A History Of Science Vol 4':

... of all the teachings, of the great Paracelsus had been gradually taking root among the better class of alchemists, and about the middle of the seventeenth ...
... substances would yield, putting them into the vessel, which I filled with quicksilver, and kept inverted in a basin of the same . With this apparatus, ...
... of the operation would be oxygenated and consequently incombustible. There cannot, therefore, exist, as far as relates to us, any combustible ...
... and evaporated left a matter that tinged turmeric brown, which would have happened had it been lime, a substance that exists in considerable quantities ...
... unfortunate, the experts do not agree among themselves as to the validity of essor Lockyer's conclusions. Some, like essor Crookes, have accepted them ...
... of the capillaries, but he added much to the anatomical knowledge of several structures of the body, notably as to the structure of cartilages ...
... of the air disappears, and that carbonic-acid gas is added to the inspired air. It was shown, too, that the blood, having come in contact with the air, ...
... as did Schleiden also, what the word ordinarily implies-a cavity walled in on all sides. He conceived that the ultimate constituents of all tissues ...
... viscid fluid, and in 1846 he had become so impressed with the importance of this universal cell substance that be gave it the name of protoplasm. ...
... involved that in no single case has the exact nature of the metabolisms wrought by these organs been fully made out. Each is in its way a chemical ...
... not nearly enough present to the minds of a civilized people, that to this day the bulk of the earth is a waste as far as man is concerned. Another ...
... Hooker had come to be more than half a convert to Darwin's views. Lyell was still sceptical, yet he urged Darwin to publish his theory without ...
... and lay his doctrine open to ridicule by the unreasonable teachings of his dotage,. Hahnemann rejected all the teachings of morbid anatomy and pathology ...
... practice was the German physician Avenbrugger, who published a book about it as early as 1761. This book had even been translated into French, then ...
... of the question of spontaneous generation, had given him unequalled resources in microscopical technique. And so when, with the aid of his laboratory ...
... and Roux, he had produced an attenuated virus of the anthrax microbe by the use of which, as he affirmed with great confidence, he could protect sheep, ...
... present connection, is the fact that these studies of the insane gave emphasis to the novel idea, which by-and-by became accepted as beyond question, ...
... the observation of the inhibition of the heart's action by a nervous impulse furnished the point of departure for studies that led to a better understanding ...
... denotes the female sex (9) that within the cartouches the hieroglyphic symbols have a positively phoic value, either alphabetic or syllabic and (10) ...
... makes the secret evident. It is simply a case of time-defying materials. Each one of these Assyrian documents appears to be, and in reality is, nothing ...