Cover of A Vindication Of The Press

A Vindication Of The Press

Auhtor: Daniel Defoe

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 42
eBook size: 350Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, May 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Vindication Of The Press':

Bound with Richardson J. of Newent. Thoughts upon thinking. 1972.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Vindication Of The Press':


... the allusion to the malicious and violent Criticisms of a certain Gentleman in its Disfavour [p. 23], might suggest that Defoe had in mind Dennis' ...
... in the third he expatiates upon the qualifications of authors. One may admit at once the comparative worthlessness of the pamphlet as a contribution ...
... a Person of Little Learning, but of prodigious Natural Parts and the latter having but a small share of Literature. The further example of the literary ...
... to all manner of Indecencies, and the Congregations usually resort thither with the same Regard as a Rake of the Town would do to Mother Wybourn's, ...
... to Humane Nature. How far Theology is improv'd from those inestimable Writings, I need not to enlarge, since it is highly conspicuous that ...
... soever: And the Hands of the Patriots and Men of Eminence who should Illuminate the Age, and open the Eyes of the deluded People are thereby tied ...
... the Eyes of the People would be open, as well for as against their Prince, and their fearing a worse Evil should succeed, might make them easy under ...
... Age) I leave to the Determination of every impartial Reader. 'Tis by Writing that Arts and Sciences are Cultivated, Navigation and Commerce (by ...
... Fortune to hit the capricious Humour of the Age after he has attained a Reputation with the utmost Difficulty, he's sure to meet with the severest ...
... if a Man has all the Qualifications necessary in Poetry, as an Elegance of Style, an Excellency of Wit, and a Nobleness of Thought were Master ...
... without making an Examination into the Merit of the Work and the Names of other Persons, equally qualified for Writing, and perhaps of greater ...
... entring the Lists of Writing and was not the World in general more good-natur'd and favourable to youthful Performances than the Criticks, there ...
... Favour but unless they do it with more Impartiality, Temper and Candour than of late, they may, with equal prospect of Success, endeavour to turn ...
... in the World, that a Poet is entirely born such, and that Poetry is a particular Gift of Heaven, not but I confess there is a great deal in natural ...
... any Ancient or Modern Poet of the greatest Excellency, and perhaps beyond any Poetry ever Printed in the English Language) This Author is Characteriz'd ...
... (particularly in point of Manners) of the Members of those August Assemblies. A good Conversation is the greatest Advantage an Author can possibly ...
... of Conversation abroad, and the Advantages attending Travelling are so very great, that they are not to be express'd this finishes Education in ...
... in Conversation, vulgar and deficient in the Mother-Tongue, and who have written most egregious Nonsense from whence it is evident, that Writing ...
... 6. Representation of the Impiety and Immorality of the Stage (1704) and Some Thoughts Concerning the Stage (1704). Second Year ...
... Though It Be Of His Worst EnemiesAn Appeal To Honour And Justice by Daniel Defoe. This account of public affairs of his time by Daniel Defoe is ...