Cover of A Description Of The Bar And Frame Hive

A Description Of The Bar And Frame Hive

Auhtor: W Augustus Munn

Language: english
Published: 1844

Genres:

instructional,  science,  nature
Downloads: 411
eBook size: 53Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Description Of The Bar And Frame Hive':

A Description Of The Bar And Frame Hive by W Augustus Munn. By first giving a general description of the bar-and-frame-hive the details of its construction can be better explained afterwards. An oblong box is formed of well seasoned wood of an inch in thickness about thirty inches long sixteen inches high and twelve inches broad but the size may be varied to suit the convenience or taste of different apiarians. Instead of the lid of the box being flat it is made in the shape of the roof of a cottage and with projecting eaves to throw off the wet more effectually. One of the long sides of the box is constructed to open with hinges and to hang on a level with the bottom of the box and is held up by means of two quadrants. As many grooves half of an inch broad half an inch deep and about 9-1 2 inches long are formed 1-1 8 of an inch apart in the inside of the bottom of the box as its length will admit. In the other side a long half inch slip is cut for the egress and ingress of the bees having a piece of wood about an inch thick and four inches wide fastened on the pg 8 outside just under the opening to form the alighting board for them. At the top of the side of the box which is made to let down a four inch piece of mahogany the length of the inside of the box is secured in having corresponding grooves formed half an inch broad 1-1 8 of an inch deep and half an inch apart to those made in the bottom of the box leaving just twelve inches between the bottom grooves and the upper bar grooves.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Description Of The Bar And Frame Hive':


... Description of the Bar-and-Frame-Hive, by. W. Augustus Munn. Title: A Description of the Bar-and-Frame-Hive With an Abstract of Wildman's ...
... closed the backs of the bee-frames with the slips of tin, and fastened the side lid of the box against them, and also removed one of the sheets of ...
... into the gable, and k the outside appearance of the ventilator. The side of the box marked A C E E, is made to let down and form a table I J, hung ...
... it is wished to examine the bees, &c., as the 1-1/8 of an inch spaces between the grooves will allow of a sufficient distance to be preserved, ...
... long spindle, in and out of the box, into the observation-frame. The use of this observation frame must now be explained more fully: the top lid of ...
... is removed then the lid, I J, being shut up and bolted, and the upper lid, G H, closed, the box may be locked up. When the bees have been ...
... the hive should be so constructed as to allow of every part of the combs to be inspected at any moment, and capable of removal when requisite: and while ...
... not be doing justice to Mr. R. Golding, if I did not particularly mention his improved Grecian hive by the use of which combs may be removed from ...
... times but the directions given by Columella and Virgil are as good now as when they were written and as is observed by the writer in No. CXLI. of the ...
... of that country, there yet remain in it several traces of the industry and skill of the ancient Egyptians. One of their most admirable contrivances ...
... be 12,000,000 pints of honey, and 3,000,000 lbs. of wax per annum, worth about five shillings per pint for the honey, and one shilling and sixpence ...
... some honey-combs in a place near Trebizonde, and in consequence became intoxicated, and did not recover their strength for three or four days and these ...
... of pasture as he possibly can, should next be careful to guard them from the numerous enemies which prey upon them, and destroy their honey-combs. Bees ...
... much covetousness breaks the bag.. It is impossible to ascertain what quantity of honey will serve a hive of bees the whole winter, because the ...
... came down to the bottom of the hive to feed on the fered bounty. In prosperous hives or colonies, as soon as the severity of the winter's frost is ...
... I would advise to hive them as soon as possible, and remove them in the evening to the place where they are to remain. The supposed relative value of ...
... the operator to be well guarded at all points. Wildman weighed bees and found it required 4,928 bees to make a pound of sixteen ounces, but the different ...
... the materials of which are collected by the bees, from the nectaries at the base of the coroll? of flowers, where this vegetable production is secreted. It ...
... the rest by her slower movements, her greater length and larger size and the general appearance of her body, being of a more dark orange colour, and ...
... Upon them devolves the whole care and labour of the colony, to collect pollen, propolis, and honey to build the combs and to attend upon the brood ...