Cover of Narodism and the Class of Wage Workers

Narodism and the Class of Wage Workers

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1907

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 481
eBook size: 290Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, March 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
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Summary of the Book 'Narodism and the Class of Wage Workers':

The perspective which Lenin arrived at in 1917 coincided with Trotskys theory of Permanent Revolution worked out following the experience of the 1905 revolution. This resolved the long debate within the Russian labor movement which revolved around three different conceptions of the coming revolution. All the Russian Marxists were agreed that the tasks of social transformation facing them were those of the bourgeois-democratic revolution. These were: the breaking up of the big estates and the distribution of the land to the peasants. The abolition of the Tsarist monarchy and the establishment of a democratic republic. The separation of the church and state. The introduction of social reforms urgently demanded by the workers and the peasants but also necessary to clear the way for the development of capitalism. Given this which political forces would provide the leadership? Would it be (a) the liberal capitalist representatives? If so would the workers parties including the Bolsheviks limit themselves to conditional support for the liberals accepting that the struggle for socialism would come later under more favorable conditions which would develop under a capitalist regime? Would it be (b) the working class in alliance with the representatives of the peasantry who would take the power - limiting themselves however at this stage to bourgeois-democratic tasks? Or would it be (c) the working class leading the exploited peasantry behind them who would take power carry through the bourgeois-democratic tasks - but at the same time implementing radical changes in their own interest which would begin the transition to socialism? Position (a) was adopted by the Mensheviks who formed the right wing of the Social-Democratic party. From Marx they drew highly schematic conclusions: that feudalism capitalism and socialism followed in succession and one historical stage had to be complete before another could commence. There was no question according to this view of the working class initiating a socialist revolution until the bourgeois revolution was complete.

Excerpts from the Book 'Narodism and the Class of Wage Workers':


... Domain: Lenin Internet Archive (2000). You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work as well as make derivative and commercial ...
... THE CLASS OF WAGE-WORKERS ? ? The tenth anniversary of the death of the liberal-Narodnik writer Mikhailovsky ...
... and seventies? No. It is absolutely untrue. This question was discussed by the Narodniks in general, and by the contributors to Russkoye Bogatstvo ...
... them among the workers? This is a shabby trick, and things must be going bad with those who resort to such tricks. ? ? ? What are the implications ...
... to that very same bourgeoisie. ? ? Prior to the rise of the working-class movement, such theories of socialism were prevalent in all countries ...
... theory of the benevolent petty proprietors regarding the possibility of avoiding capitalism is refuted. By covering up the fundamental mistake of the ...
... their emancipation. Russia is already in the phase of capitalism, writes Mr. Rakitnikov. ? ? This remarkable admission is tantamount to ...
... the wage-workers' class struggle against the bourgeoisie is the only way in which socialism can be achieved. ? ? To this day the programme of the ...
... like an opportunist when he says: ? ? to support peasant farming does not mean battling against the stream of inexorable economic development. ...
... proprietors are forming associations to market grain, hay, milk and meat at the highest prices, and to hire labour at the lowest. The freer the peasants ...
... class movement with the aid of petty-bourgeois slogans. The Left Narodniks would be well advised to turn to democratic work among the peasants - that ...
... the journal, who eventually became prominent members of the Socialist-Revolutionary, the Popular Socialist and Trudovik parties in the Duma. In ...
... creator of the Soviet Communist Party, leader of the 1917 October Revolution, and founder of the USSR. As head of the Bolsheviks (19171924) he ...
... more<... of Russia from the 'India' of Europe to the second most powerful economy and country on the globe. Despite the squandering of the advantages ...
... step forward in history. The working class, though a minority, led all oppressed and exploited people in smashing the Tsarist dictatorship. Taking ...
... slogans demanded of these parties' leaders that they do the job their supporters expected them to do. Their key demands were that the socialists ...
... The man who returned to Russia in the spring of 1917 was of medium height, quite bald, except for the back of his head, with a reddish beard. The ...
... Lenin arrived in Petrograd during the All-Russian Conference of Bolshevik Party Workers. In his first address to the delegates, he advocated uncompromising ...
... to the 20th century the practice of taking an all-embracing ideology and imposing it on an entire society rapidly and mercilessly he created ...