Cover of Fighting France

Fighting France

Auhtor: Edith Wharton

Language: english
Published: 1918

Genres:

war,  history
Downloads: 499
eBook size: 110Kb

Review by Chandler, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Fighting France':

Fighting France Edith Wharton by Edith Wharton. AUGUST On the 30th of July 1914 motoring north from Poitiers we had lunched somewhere by the roadside under apple-trees on the edge of a field. Other fields stretched away on our right and left to a border of woodland and a village steeple. All around was noonday quiet and the sober disciplined landscape which the traveller s memory is apt to evoke as distinctively French. Sometimes even to accustomed eyes these ruled-off fields and compact grey villages seem merely flat and tame at other moments the sensitive imagination sees in every thrifty sod and even furrow the ceaseless vigilant attachment of generations faithful to the soil. The particular bit of landscape before us spoke in all its lines of that attachment. The air seemed full of the long murmur of human effort the rhythm of oft-repeated tasks the serenity of the scene smiled away the war rumours which had hung on us since morning. Download Fighting France Now

Excerpts from the Book 'Fighting France':


... to pass into the cathedral was like entering the dense obscurity of a church in Spain. At first all detail was imperceptible we were in a hollow night. ...
... been expected to provoke a patriotic outburst it excited no more attention than if one of the soldiers had turned aside to give a penny to a beggar. ...
... and looked at it, not dully or uncomprehendingly, but consciously, advisedly, and in silence as if already foreseeing all it would cost to keep that ...
... to feel the change just beyond Meaux. Between that quiet episcopal city and the hill-town of Montmirail, some forty miles farther east, there are no ...
... seems to be no rank distinction in this happy democratic army, and the simple private, if he chooses to treat himself to the excellent fare of the ...
... four or five hundred and we admired the skill and devotion with which he had dealt with the difficulty, and managed to lodge his patients decently. We ...
... of a busy unconscious community. One looks instinctively, in the eyes of the passers by, for a reflection of that other vision, and feels diminished ...
... it had seemed packed on our previous visit, was now quivering and cracking with fresh crowds. The stir about the fountain, in the square before the Haute ...
... carries about for his land-Lusitanias was tossed on each hearth. It was all so well done that one wonders-almost apologetically for German thoroughness-that ...
... puppies. Below the terrace, lost Lorraine stretched away to her blue heights, a vision of summer peace: and just above us the unsleeping hill kept watch, ...
... elderly, bearded man, with a good average civilian face-the kind that one runs against by hundreds in any French crowd. He had a scalp-wound which had ...
... meadow. The sun had set when we got back to our starting-point in the underground village. The chasseurs-a-pied were lounging along the roadside and ...
... Lorraine were blown up, burnt down, deliberately erased from the earth. At worst they are like stone-yards, at best like Pompeii. But Ypres has been ...
... way was clear to Nieuport and the answer was that we might go on. Our road ran through the Bois Triangulaire, a bit of woodland exposed to constant ...
... long-drawn-out movements of troops went on, to the wail of bugles, and under the eye of the lonely sentinel on the sand-crest then the soldiers poured ...
... and dash did the greater credit to their riders. The lancers, in particular, executed an effective musical ride about a central pennon, to the immense ...
... into the mountains. We started early, taking our way along a narrow interminable valley that sloped up gradually toward the east. The road was encumbered ...
... with dewy cobwebs hanging to the vines. I could not understand where we were, or what it was all about, or why a shell from the enemy outpost did not ...
... the disaster. In all classes the feeling is the same: every word and every act is based on the resolute ignoring of any alternative to victory. The French ...
... well as satisfaction, of traditions as well as experiments, of dying as much as of living. Never have they considered life as a thing to be cherished ...