Cover of A Letter to Students at the Capri Party School

A Letter to Students at the Capri Party School

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1895

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 327
eBook size: 232Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Letter to Students at the Capri Party School':

It took a good deal of negotiation and courage for Lenin and a group of like-minded Russian revolutionaries to travel from Switzerland back to Russia through the enemy country of Germany. The man who returned to Russia in the spring of 1917 was of medium height quite bald except for the back of his head with a reddish beard. The features of his face were strikingslanted eyes that looked piercingly at others and high cheek-bones under a towering forehead. The rest of his appearance was deceptively ordinary. Fluent in many languages Lenin spoke Russian with a slight speech defect but was a powerful public speaker in small groups as well as before large audiences. A tireless worker he made others work tirelessly. He tried to push those who worked with him to devote every ounce of their energy to the revolutionary task at hand. He was impatient with any other activities including small talk and discussions of political theories. Indeed he was suspicious of intellectuals and felt most at home in the company of simple folk. Having been brought up in the tradition of the Russian nobility Lenin loved hunting hiking horseback riding boating mushroom hunting and the outdoor life in general. Once he had returned to Russia Lenin worked constantly to use the revolutionary situation that had been created by the fall of the czar and convert it into a proletarian revolution that would bring his own party into power. As a result of his activities opinions in Russia quickly became more and more sharply at odds. Moderate forces found themselves less and less able to maintain any control. In the end by October 1917 power fell into the hands of the Bolsheviks. As a result of the so-called October Revolution Lenin found himself not only the leader of his party but also the chairman of the Council of Peoples Commissars (equivalent to prime minister) of the newly proclaimed Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic (the basis for the future Union of Soviet Socialist Republics).

Excerpts from the Book 'A Letter to Students at the Capri Party School':


... A LETTER TO COMRADES JULIUS, VANYA, SAVELY, IVAN, VLADIMIR, ...
... TO COMRADES JULIUS, VANYA, SAVELY, IVAN, VLADIMIR, STANISLAV AND FOMA, ...
... making. You are powerless to change them. But these conditions predetermine the character of the school, so much so that no good intentions on your part, ...
... or group will undertake to share responsibility for a school whose trend is already predetermined by the lecturing personnel, if that trend is hostile. ...
... as one of the lecturers by certain Social-Democratic groups who had heard him read a paper. This Comrade Stanislav is a most ardent otzovist and ...
... Next, look at the lecturers you now have over there in Capri. There are no Bolsheviks among them, while all the adherents of the new faction (the faction ...
... the Party Conference in December 1908, and ultimately broke away completely as a separate faction. ? ? To deny that this entire group of comrades ...
... are writers, yet not one of them has made a single attack in the press on the god-building propaganda of Lunacharsky and Bazarov. ? ? If, in ...
... not by decisions of the Council of students, not by curricula and so forth, but by the lecturing personnel. And since the lecturing personnel ...
... Capri. Trotsky told this to Comrade Innokenty, saying: If this is a Party affair I shall be glad to take part in it if it is a private concern run by ...
... go on to the question of Paris. I told you in my letter that if you are really interested in having lectures from myself and my comrades-in-idea you ...
... lecturers to Capri. ? ? ? But the financial aspect, as I have already told you in my last letter,[*] is not by any means the most important. Think: ...
... ? ? But for the school, as a Party concern, Bolshevik lecturers are not the only important factor. Paris is the largest emigrant centre, where ...
... Social-Democratic newspapers are published in Paris. In a word, it is clear, as clear as daylight, to anyone who knows anything at all about life abroad, ...
... is out of the question at any time. The local organisations in Russia may not have known this, but the organisers of the school knew it perfectly well. ...
... Social-Democrats, eminent for their knowledge of the labour movement abroad, who do not be long to any factions: Parvus and Rosa Luxemburg (Germany), ...
... of his Dnevnik, exposing the liquidationism of Potresov and the official Mensheviks the attempts to create a revolutionary Menshevism, and so on). ...
... find: The Philosophy of the Proletarian Struggle. There is the philosophical materialism of Marx and Engels, but nowhere is there the Philosophy of ...
... often by the word proletarian the further away it is from the proletarian world-outlook, has been and is the occupation only of the above-mentioned ...
... Ilyich Lenin : A Comparison of the Stolypin and the Narodnik Agrarian ProgrammesS'o (Alone), published in Paris in 1892, is a collection of poems ...