Cover of A Daughter Of The Sea

A Daughter Of The Sea

Auhtor: Charles Wesley Sanders

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 10
eBook size: 254Kb

Review by Chandler, November 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Daughter Of The Sea':

Jean the Soldier and Eulalie the Devils Daughter is a French fairy tale collected by Achille Millien. The fable is classed as Aarne-Thompson type 313 (A girl helps the hero to flee) and revolves about a transformation chase. Others of this type include The Water Nixie The Foundling-Bird The Master Maid and The Two Kings Children. The motifs contain notable similarities to the legend of Jason and Medea in the tasks assigned to the hero and in the help from a woman connected with the villain.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Daughter Of The Sea':


... of his ship, paused as he caught sight of Captain Winton coming along the wharf. Then McAuliffe slipped back to the deck and disappeared into his ...
... shoulders wore massive. His unbuttoned shirt collar disclosed a bull neck. His eyes were slate-colored, cold, quick to show hate, never gentle. His ...
... held McAuliffe in respect. He knew that there was no fear in McAuliffe's heart then. McAuliffe had proved that a hundred times. And, habitually a ...
... it. The uncle was a bachelor, uncertain of temper to every one except Dora. She, men said, could wind him about her little finger. That ...
... once at them and backed away from Winton. I have no answer for you to that question, Winton, he said. He had taken but three paces when ...
... He turned to the sailors. A fine lad you sail under, this. he said. Hell's own spawn, I say. He turned back to McAuliffe. That'll be all ...
... didn't hurt you. You haven't a mark. You don't want to be brawling along the river-front with a man like him, now, do you? Ugly beast. McAuliffe ...
... time. Dora, it's hard for me to follow the route you've picked for me. I've given you my word I would not brawl, and I wilt not. I'll be a gentleman ...
... Winton's spree was somewhat protracted. He heard nothing of McAuliffe till Saturday morning. In the mean time he had not seen McAuliffe. Coming ...
... the Flying Spray sail! he demanded. I haven't heard, sir, said the man. Winton cursed him dully and bade him find out. The man was back ...
... swept up through Winton, like thick smoke from the flame of his wrath. He was lost to whatever decency had been in him. At his sides his hands closed ...
... tug cast off outside the harbor the Flying Spray was a quarter of a mile away, standing off to the northeast. Winton set his own course in pursuit ...
... opened the door. Winton stood on the threshold. McAuliffe straightened up and took a forward step. His face was ashen with fury. Behind ...
... roved past McAuliffe and sought the girl's face. The fire in those eyes increased in intensity. Come out, McAuliffe, and face a man, he cried. ...
... this girl who was sprung from a long line of men and women of the salt seas. For the moment the veneer hid her, but she felt something stronger ...
... that he had come thus far. With a cry, half of rage, half of triumph, he leaped for her. The revolver spoke. Winton stood an instant, swaying, ...
... But McAuliffe wriggled in his arms and eased the pressure when it became most serious. His right hand crept up and worried Winton's throat and ...
... death must not lie at your door. She nodded, mute. McAuliffe went further aft and came upon Winton's stretched body. He knelt beside Winton and ...
... coarse, red face-when I knew that somehow he had got the better of you, had hurt you very likely, I was glad to shoot him. What do you think of that? ...
... &c. Wherein the Chief Argument of that Book is farther Illustrated and Explained is a summary of the main doctrines of David Hume's work A Treatise ...