Cover of A Great Man

A Great Man

Auhtor: Arnold Bennett

Language: english
Published: 1904

Genres:

fiction and literature
Downloads: 446
eBook size: 191Kb

Review by M. Erb, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Great Man':

The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression is a book by Amity Shlaes and published by HarperCollins. The book is a re-analysis of the events of the Great Depression generally from a free-market perspective. The book criticizes Herbert Hoover and the Smoot-Hawley Tariff for their role in exacerbating the Depression through government intervention. It criticizes Franklin D. Roosevelt for erratic policies that froze investment and for not taking smart enough steps to stop the Depression. Shlaes criticizes the New Deal for extending the length of the Depression and for its effects on individuals. Shlaes praises the model offered by Wendell Willkie before the 1940 presidential election where the New Deal would have been scaled back and business would have stepped in. The book begins with an anecdote of the 1937 recession eight years after the Depression began when Roosevelt adopted budget-balancing policies indistinguishable from the stereotype of what Hoover supposedly did. Shlaes presents her arguments in part by telling stories of self-starters who showed what the free market could have accomplished without the New Deal.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Great Man':


... I am thankful to say, more than nine millions. Why, then, this outcry against the allocation of somewhat less than nine millions out of our vast national ...
... of it was so manifest-that their boy was the most prodigious boy that ever was. He went into knickerbockers. He learnt hymns. He went to school-and ...
... occurrence. Where did you steal that from, my bold buccaneer.'. 'I didn't steal it,' Henry asserted. 'I made it up.'. 'Then you will be ...
... in the cellar-kitchen. The door yielded before him as before its rightful lord, and he passed into his sacred domestic privacy with an air which plainly ...
... being London, you know,' he had said. And Aunt Annie had exclaimed: 'What a pretty title.' Whereupon Henry had remarked contemptuously and dismissingly: ...
... gripped under his right arm. Partly this strange burden and partly the brilliant aspect of the building made him feel self-conscious and humble and ...
... I tell you candidly, I like it. It's graceful and touching, and original. It's got atmosphere. It's got that indefinable something-je ne sais quoi-that ...
... Henry replied. Mrs. Mawner enveloped the pair in her sinister glance. 'Shall you be long, sir.'. 'I can't say.' Henry was firm. Giving a hitch ...
... home' meant-well, it meant the exact opposite of Dawes Road: he was sure of that. As for Miss Foster, he suspected, he allowed himself to suspect, ...
... attributing this indecision to Henry's unwillingness to open doors for himself, stepped back across the pavement in another stride, and held the ...
... at nine forty-five that night. 'You didn't mind my introducing him to you. He's a decent little man in some ways,' said Geraldine humbly, when ...
... again, and asked Henry to tea at the flat in Chenies Street on a Saturday afternoon. Henry went, and found the flat closed. He expected to receive ...
... not because she imagined that she had achieved humour, but because that was her way of making herself agreeable. If anybody had told her that she ...
... face once more, as though after long years. And there were little black marks round her eyes, due to her tears and the fog and the fragment of lace. ...
... It gave birth to the most extraordinary sensations in Henry's breast. And other names, such as 'Casino de Paris,' 'Eldorado,' 'Scala,' glittered, ...
... not a fair question,' Henry had said at length. Whereupon Tom, without the least warning, had burst into loud laughter: 'My bold buccaneer, you take the ...
... It is why I am come to Monte Carlo, for that lunch.'. They lunched at the Htel de Paris. He was intoxicated that afternoon, though not with the Heidsieck ...
... into the bill at once. If I could take him this to-morrow-'. 'I'll post it to you to-night,' said Henry. 'But I shall want to see Mr. Pilgrim ...
... Map, Henry's confessed adorer, was the victim, Henry thought, of a highly-distorted sense of perspective. The principal comfort which he derived from ...
... his good-nature forced him to yield to the pressure of a journalist. That journalist was Alfred Doxey, who had married on the success of Love in Babylon, ...