Cover of A Week After the Dublin Massacre

A Week After the Dublin Massacre

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1903

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 203
eBook size: 260Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, November 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Week After the Dublin Massacre':

Over the next twelve years bolshevism which had begun as a faction within the Russian Social-Democratic Workers party gradually emerged as an independent party that had cut its ties with all other Russian Marxists. The process involved long and bitter arguments against Mensheviks as well as against all those who worked to reunite the factions. It involved fights over funds struggles for control of newspapers the development of rival organizations and meetings of rival groups. Disputes concerned many questions about the goals and strategies of Marxism and the role of national (rather than international) struggles within Marxism. Since about 1905 the international socialist movement had begun also to discuss the possibility of a major war breaking out among European nations. In 1907 and 1912 members met and condemned such wars in advance pledging not to support them. Lenin had wanted to go further than that. He had urged active opposition to the war effort and a transformation of any war into a proletarian revolution. When World War I (19141918 a conflict involving most European nations as well as Russia the United States and Japan) broke out most socialist leaders in the countries involved supported the war effort. For Lenin this was proof that he and the other leaders shared no common aims or views. The break between the two schools of Marxism could not be fixed. During World War I (191418) Lenin lived in Switzerland. He attended several conferences of radical socialists opposed to the war. He read a large amount of literature on the Marxist idea of state government and wrote a first draft for a book on the subject The State and Revolution. He also studied literature dealing with world politics of the time and wrote an important book Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism in 1916. By the beginning of 1917 he had fits of depression and wrote to a close friend that he thought he would never see another revolution. This was about a month before the overthrow of the Russian czar in the winter of 1917 which marked the beginning of the 1917 Russian Revolution.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Week After the Dublin Massacre':


... A WEEK AFTER THE DUBLIN MASSACRE ? Severnaya Pravda No. 27, September 3, 1913 Nash Put No. 8, September 3, 1913 Signed: V. Published ...
... from the Russian by George Hanna Edited by Robert Daglish Public Domain: Lenin Internet Archive (2000). You may freely copy, distribute, display ...
... source. Creative Commons License ? ? A WEEK AFTER THE DUBLIN MASSACRE ? ? On Sunday, September 7 (August ...
... police. ? ? The meeting took place in the same street (O'Connell Street) and at the same spot where the meeting banned by the police was to have ...
... they are most frequently held ? ? The police kept out of sight. The streets were filled with workers. There were crowds of people, but complete ...
... reigns without the police truncheon. ? ? Britain has a constitution - and the authorities did not dare to bring their drunken policemen ...
... of the English proletariat, condemned the crime perpetrated against the people, called upon the workers to display international solidarity, ...
... freedom of assembly and association, and calling for an immediate investigation - under the direction of independent persons and with a guarantee ...
... Square. Groups of socialists and workers came with their banners. There were many posters with cartoons and ? slogans on topical events. The ...
... a policeman waving a red flag with the inscription, Silence! ? ? Outstanding speeches were made by Ben Tillett, who showed that the Liberal ...
... shameless acts of police violence in Dublin. ? ? It is instructive to note that the principal slogan at the London and Dublin meetings was the ...
... regime, generally speaking. The freedom of association demanded by the workers is one of the reforms absolutely necessary and quite achievable ...
... of workers' insurance in Russia). ? ? Freedom of association is equally indispensable to the workers of Britain and of Russia. And the British ...
... for its achievement and of its complete feasibility under the British Constitution (just as the Russian workers would be right in advancing the partial ...
... are absent without which the demand for freedom of association is simply ridiculous and is merely a current liberal phrase designed to deceive the people ...
... of association - freedom most urgently needed by both the workers and the entire people - cannot be conducted without contrasting the impotent and ...
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