Cover of A Cleric In Naples

A Cleric In Naples

Auhtor: Giacomo Casanova

Language: english
Published: 1894

Genres:

biography
Downloads: 302
eBook size: 462Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, November 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Cleric In Naples':

Giacomo Girolamo Casanova de Seingalt (April 2 1725 ? June 4 1798) was a Venetian adventurer and author. His main book Histoire de ma vie (Story of My Life) part autobiography and part memoir is regarded as one of the most authentic sources of the customs and norms of European social life during the 18th century. He was so famous as a womanizer that his name remains synonymous with the art of seduction. He associated with European royalty popes and cardinals along with luminaries such as Voltaire Goethe and Mozart. He spent his last years in Bohemia as a librarian in Count Waldsteins household where he also wrote the story of his life.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Cleric In Naples':


... in Venice, came in and paid me many compliments. He told me that I had arrived just in time to go to a picnic got up by the Macaronic academicians ...
... was a Christian woman, I could buy her, if I waited for her after leaving the lazzaretto. I was compelled to tell her that I did not possess the means ...
... company, because I was afraid of being sent as a felon to the galleys if I continued my journey with him. We exchanged high words I called him an ...
... compels me to remain quiet on my straw bed the monk screams, swears, struggles, the dog barks furiously, the old man coughs all is noise and confusion. ...
... The good bishop, seeing me full of sad thoughts, and almost astounded at the prospect of the miserable life I should have to lead with him, tried ...
... Panagiotti, who was glad to see me. Was I to blush at the sight of the good man I had at first deceived. No, for in his opinion I had acted very ...
... I do not know which of the two.. I went back to our room, and I was polite enough to go to bed first, in order to make it easier for the ladies to ...
... on to tear the mask from their faces, although they deemed themselves powerful enough to despise him. He read the letter with great attention, and ...
... adopted by all those who wish to be respected (noblemen excepted) even if they are not in the ecclesiastical ession. I felt very miserable, and did ...
... mistress must be longing for consolation as much as he had been himself, assuring me that his letter could not in any way implicate me, and that I was ...
... and Don Francisco, taking a candle, escorted me to my pretty little room adjoining the one in which the two sisters were to sleep, and, after shewing ...
... the proof of my gratitude, and I turn to her with all the rapture of a beginner, feeling that my ardour is increased by Angelique's ecstasy, as for the ...
... of Silesia to Love. This title brought the most fascinating blushes on her countenance. But Love is not mentioned in the son, exclaimed ...
... will save me from dishonour. I gave her the necessary instructions, as to sending the note to the cardinal, assuring her that he would have her ...
... of more than he could achieve, in telling me that he had friends everywhere. But to whom can he recommend me in Constantinople. I have not the slightest ...
... that, in spite of her courage, she should have enjoyed only an incomplete pleasure. As soon as we were in our row boat, Bellino, who had recovered from ...
... of her beastly lust, and of an effrontery which exposed her to the shame of being repulsed, for she could not possibly know whether you would feel ...
... to submit to the scandalous, degrading examination, because everywhere I am thought to have too much the appearance of a girl, and I am admitted only ...
... night in her arms. When I woke up in the morning, I admired her lovely face while she was sleeping: all I knew of her came back to my mind the words ...
... had informed him that she was a woman, and that she had made up her mind not to appear as a castrato any more he had expressed himself delighted at ...