Cover of A Room With A View

A Room With A View

Auhtor: E Forster

Language: english
Published: 1908

Genres:

fiction and literature,  romance,  audiobook
Downloads: 43
eBook size: 196Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Room With A View':

This Edwardian social comedy explores love and prim propriety among an eccentric cast of characters assembled in an Italian pensione and in a corner of Surrey England.A charming young Englishwoman Lucy Honeychurch faints into the arms of a fellow Britisher when she witnesses a murder in a Florentine piazza. Attracted to this man George Emerson?who is entirely unsuitable and whose father just may be a Socialist?Lucy is soon at war with the snobbery of her class and her own conflicting desires. Back in England she is courted by a more acceptable if stifling suitor and soon realizes she must make a startling decision that will decide the course of her future: she is forced to choose between convention and passion.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Room With A View':


... be a serious thing if I put her under an obligation to people of whom we know nothing. His manner was somewhat unfortunate. I hope I acted for the best. You ...
... estate. Italy receded. They tried to remember the last name of Lady Louisa some one, who had taken a house near Summer Street the other year, but she ...
... paid properly. And as for the frescoes, I see no truth in them. Look at that fat man in blue! He must weigh as much as I do, and he is shooting into ...
... the platform by the driver. Her two companions looked grave. Mr. Beebe, who felt responsible for her in the absence of Miss Bartlett, ventured to say: I ...
... a model of the leaning Tower of Pisa. Generally, replied Mr. Eager, one has only sympathy for their success. The desire for education and for ...
... Miss Lavish. Tell me, where do they place the scene of that wonderful seventh day? But Mr. Eager proceeded to tell Miss Honeychurch that on the right ...
... tiniest cough, and I have had it three days. It's nothing to do with sitting here at all. There was only one way of treating the situation. At the end ...
... who was writing a letter, did continually read out to him what she had written. And continually did she rise from her seat and part the curtains ...
... life that he desired. I've come for tea and for gossip. Isn't this news? News? I don't understand you, said Cecil. News? Mr. Beebe, whose news was ...
... I meant to. I can't, I really can't turn out Miss Flack. Am I not always right? She ought to have gone before the contract was signed. Does she ...
... she warmed. She was perfectly sure that there had been a second tourist of whom the same story had been told. The name escaped her. What was ...
... longer despise our bodies. Mr. Beebe disclaimed placing the Garden of Eden anywhere. In this???not in other things???we men are ahead. We despise the body ...
... Lucy, hoping that this would pass for a reply. Is he the clever sort, or is he a decent chap? Ask Cecil it is Cecil who brought him here. He ...
... tea at the view, felt the eternal attraction of Chance, and turned round. But this did not do, either. Please???please???I know I am a sad spoilsport, ...
... her hand to her cheek. He does not love me. No. How terrible if he did! But he has not told. He will not tell. She longed to shout the words: It ...
... Emerson has had to go. What a nuisance! That spoils the four. I say, Cecil, do play, do, there's a good chap. It's Floyd's last day. Do ...
... the desire of two old ladies to visit Athens. A carriage was drawn up outside Windy Corner, and just as he caught sight of the house it started, bowled ...
... Charlotte have succeeded. The honours of the day rested with Mr. Beebe. By his tact and common sense, and by his influence as a clergyman???for ...
... you do remember it? He has misbehaved himself from the first. I only was told that he loved you last Sunday. I never could judge behaviour. ...
... to mend, and gazed out through the window. It was evening and again the spring. Oh, bother Charlotte, she said thoughtfully. What can such people ...