Cover of A Chapter In The Philosophy Of Value

A Chapter In The Philosophy Of Value

Auhtor: Georg Simmel

Language: english

Genres:

classic
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eBook size: 284Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
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Excerpts from the Book 'A Chapter In The Philosophy Of Value':

... The practically effective value is conferred upon the object, not merely by its own desirability, but by the desirability of another object. Not ...
... unity of all the determinations and relationships out of which the interested parties select each a certain group, and make it into a picture ...
... into which, for the purposes of our interests, we subdivide the totality of phenomena. The objectivity of economic value which we assume ...
... For example, intellectual products sometimes (not always) retain for purposes of instruction their own worth, which does not lose any of its ...
... by the like procedure in another. The main thing is that the natural and solitary economic transaction, if we may conceive of such a thing, ...
... is, as a matter of fact, much too simple. If, as is necessary, we regard economic activity as a special case of the universal life-form of exchange, ...
... former object derives its so necessary value, and whether it may come from the objects that are to be sacrificed for it, so that the equivalence ...
... of another object which is given for it. Wild fruit picked without effort, and not given in exchange, but immediately consumed, is no economic good. ...
... sundered from the value as in the economic man the economist is sundered from the man. To be sure, man is possible in times and relations ...
... that desire, in and of itself, can never establish a value if it does not encounter obstacles. But if every desire could find its satisfaction without ...
... a given degree, rarity must be associated with availability, as a characteristic of the objects themselves. If we wish to fix economic values ...
... aggregate of its kind the qualitative nature of the object is not touched by its rarity. The availability, however, seems to exist before all economic action, ...
... in which case my desire, if I do not manifest it, can exert no influence upon the demand of the present possessor he will rather adjust his ...
... themselves, and to credit to them that peculiar significance which we call their value? This certainly cannot come from their scarcity in and of itself, ...
... the point of the pistol compels the victim to sell him his watch and rings for three coppers, the fact is that under the circumstances, since the victim ...
... or degraded individual, He is really no longer a man. The fact is that this idea of man is only an average it would lose its normative character ...
... unaffected by the circumstance that later labor-power may itself furnish a measure, within the value-category, for the other contents. If the labor-power ...
... is decisive, and when we have it, it is a matter of indifference in this respect whether there exist besides many, few, or no specimens of ...
... a stock of goods which suffices to cover all the demands centered upon it, but which is so disposed that every portion of it is to be obtained ...
... can scarcity create for the object a valuation otherwise than in the reciprocal relation with another object existing under like conditions. We ...