Cover of A Lady Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852 53

A Lady Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852 53

Auhtor: Ellen Clacy

Language: english

Genres:

travel,  non fiction,  audiobook
Downloads: 92
eBook size: 192Kb

Review by Chandler, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Lady Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852 53':

A Lady S Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852 53 by Mrs Charles Ellen Clacy. Ellen Clacy set off from England to accompany her brother to the Victorian diggings in 1852. In 1963 editor Patricia Thompson noted that she seemed an ideal girl to take to the diggings She noticed everything enjoyed everything and willingly turned her hand to cooking camping or washing for gold. She filled a diary with descriptions of goldfields life and adventures involving bushrangers orphaned children falling in love and getting married. This was published almost as soon as she arrived back in England in 1853 and quickly sold out. Further biographical details remain sketchy. Margaret Anderson points to new research that hints at an absconding husband and an illegitimate child born at sea suggesting that Clacy s life was in fact more complex harder and less respectable than the one she constructed in her published account. It may be deemed presumptuous that one of my age and sex should venture to give to the public an account of personal adventures in a land which has so often been descanted upon by other and abler pens but when I reflect on the many mothers wives and sisters in England whose hearts are ever longing for information respecting the dangers and privations to which their relatives at the antipodes are exposed I cannot but hope that the presumption of my undertaking may be pardoned in consideration of the pleasure which an accurate description of some of the Australian Gold Fields may perhaps afford to many and although the time of my residence in the colonies was short I had the advantage not only in Melbourne but whilst in the bush of constant intercourse with many experienced diggers and old colonists-thus having every facility for acquiring information respecting Victoria and the other colonies.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Lady Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852 53':


... seaman, merely laughed at this impromptu salutation. I say, skipper, I don't quite like that d-d stroke of yours.. No answer but, as if ...
... cold and wet, my greatest source of discomfort arose from the want of coal-fires, and the draughts, which are innumerable, owing to the slight manner ...
... a dray and horses, and make a speculation in flour, tea, &c., on which an immense it was being made at the diggings. It would also afford the convenience ...
... till six at night, at certain fares, which are doubled after these hours. These fares are: for a passenger, 6d. a horse or bullock, 1s. a two-wheeled ...
... better than to hold forth against the powers that be and it was his greatest boast that Government had never pocketed a farthing from him in the ...
... into the next hole and thence into a complete labyrinth underground, plainly pointed out the method of escape. Seeing no use in ferreting the delinquent ...
... recommended change of air, a warmer climate, a trip to Australia. William had relatives residing in Melbourne, so the journey was quickly decided ...
... of yellow, which, with heartfelt delight they hailed as gold. It WAS MICA. Many are at first deceived by it, but it is soon distinguished by its weight, ...
... I was in a strange place became quickly evident, and among the distant hum of voices which ever and anon broke the silence not one familiar tone could ...
... whose friendly shelter we had availed ourselves the evening before, was struck by lightning, shivered into a thousand pieces. After a while the storm ...
... and the diggers they buys them of me, cos grandfather's ill, and got nobody to work for him but me.. Where do you and your grandfather live. I asked. ...
... immense mob, hooting, yelling, and screaming, as only a mob at the diggings can. It was in full pursuit, and we turned aside only in time to prevent ...
... This mountain, which forms one of what is called the Macedon range, is to be seen many miles distant, and on a clear, sunny day, the purple sides of ...
... sufficient to defray the day's expenses, and this was generally given into Frank's hands. Enraged and disappointed, the villains used most frightful ...
... to steal away the heart of the 'Downshire' belle. Prudence, however, compelled our young people to postpone their marriage, and whilst the good ...
... the life of a female, who has her own livelihood to earn, is one of badly-paid labour, entailing constant privation, and often great misery-if not ...
... to your four-footed companion, and instinct will most probably enable him to extricate you. If on foot, ascend, if possible, a rise of ground, and ...
... we were only too happy to throw them over us during the nights. One morning we were awakened by a great confusion on deck. Our ship was ...
... on the roads. Fifteen persons were stopped during the same afternoon whilst travelling on the highway between Melbourne and St. Kilda. They were robbed, ...
... for its completion. No. Thousands were subscribed in one day, and would be again were it necessary but that building, like every other, is stopped for ...