Cover of A Woman Thoughts About Women

A Woman Thoughts About Women

Auhtor: Dinah Maria Craik

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 203
eBook size: 466Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Woman Thoughts About Women':

A Woman S Thoughts About Women by Dinah Maria Mulock Craik. This is an OCR edition without illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from GeneralBooksClub.com. You can also preview excerpts from the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Original Published by Rudd Carleton in 1861 in 323 pages Subjects Women History General Poetry General Poetry English Irish Scottish Welsh Social Science Feminism Feminist Theory Social Science Women s Studies

Excerpts from the Book 'A Woman Thoughts About Women':


... We have instincts, passions, domestic affections, but friendship is, strictly speaking, none of the three. It is-to borrow the phrase to misused ...
... meeting one another's eyes, they both burst into a hearty fit of laughter, declaring they never again would pride themselves on being a bit better ...
... they refuse to add thereto the Church of England Catechism. As to visiting them-Quite impossible they are Dissenters, you know. The ...
... has a degree of sway in society, this one is society's most prostrate slave. She does not furnish her house, choose her servants, eat her ...
... fool opposite, and is fast becoming, nay, is already become, a fool's clever mate-a mere woman of the world. And he-what a noble ideal he has ...
... But to have loved and lost, either by that total disenchantment which leaves compassion as the sole substitute for love which can exist no more, ...
... that warms one's inmost heart-to them is altogether incomprehensible. To hear one of them in her rampant phase, you would suppose the whole ...
... knows it or not, you know yourself to be-not this? The free, happy ignorance of maidenhood is gone for ever the sacred dignity and honour of ...
... charitable, the pure are the most brave. I believe there are hundreds and thousands of Englishwomen who would willingly throw the shelter of their ...
... in the hope that some one may own or claim this anonymous song:- 'Do ye think of the hopes that are gone, Jeanie, As ye sit ...
... most fit for her-most adapted to the work for which He means to use her in her generation. This conviction of being at once an active and a ...
... of self-dependence need never be heard of. But it is not so. In spite of the pretty ideals of poets, the easy taken-for-granted truths of old-fashioned ...
... words-are those of a working woman, who has been such all her life, having opportunities of comparing the experience of other working women ...
... all the cares, and only half the joys of maternity or mistress-ship-even the active, bustling old maid, determined on setting everybody to ...
... hand, any class that, as a class, lacks honour, has usually, some time or other, fallen short in desert of it. Thus, among handicraftswomen, ...
... minute or two after dessert, when Master Baby appeared, mamma, who rarely sees him at any other time, and never meddles with his education, ...
... her work pretty well, with plenty of looking after, a conscientious servant is with difficulty, if at all, to be found? By conscientious, ...
... half of the families one knows, the grand burden of complaint is-servants? Is the fault altogether on one side?-which side, either party being ...
... not think it, but the kitchen is made of flesh and blood as well as the parlour. However you may insist upon No followers allowed, Emma will ...
... her room and see! For all moral qualities, good temper, truth, kindliness, and above all, conscientiousness, if these are deficient in the ...