Cover of A Tale Of A Lonely Parish

A Tale Of A Lonely Parish

Auhtor: F Marion Crawford

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 228
eBook size: 598Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Tale Of A Lonely Parish':

... unhesitatingly yielded the post of honour to the vicar, adding to enforce his opinion the very plausible argument that if he, the squire, took Mrs. ...
... in his short holiday, had never so much as mentioned him. One afternoon in January the squire found himself alone with Mrs. Goddard. It was ...
... to do it. Mrs. Ambrose had great faith in the sternness of her eye under certain circumstances, and seeing that Mrs. Goddard never winced, she gradually ...
... close to the ship-the most wonderful thing he ever saw, added Nellie with some redundance of expression. Was it a whale, child? asked her mother, ...
... and the conversation on the previous evening had been intolerably wearisome. Almost unconsciously, since the chief interest and hope of ...
... sight he came back! I saw you! You saw nothing! answered his wife desperately. How can you say so! If you knew how kind he has been, what ...
... be hiding in the neighbourhood. He came to her drawing-room window last night and the night before. Dear me! exclaimed Mr. Juxon. You don't ...
... Not at all. Are you going to the cottage? Yes-why? Nothing, said Mr. Juxon. I did not know whether you would like to walk ...
... at having John under his own roof at last. He was perhaps, like the vicar, a little nervous, but the young man did not notice it, being much absorbed ...
... the people who possessed it were the natural enemies of people who had to live by their brains. But John had very soon discovered that though Cornelius ...
... husband, little Nellie's father-this grimy wretch, whose foul rags lay heaped there in the corner, whose miserable head pressed the spotless linen ...
... young man put his hand beneath Goddard's head and gently replaced him in his former position, smoothing the pillows, and giving him a little brandy. ...
... to Mr. Juxon's account of what had happened. You are not hurt? she asked, almost incredulously. Her eyes rested on her friend's face with ...
... of his success. The vicar was not visible. It was a strange and unheard of thing-there were visitors in the drawing-room. This doubtless accounted ...
... and his set, but because every minute was important, every hour meant not only learning but meant, most emphatically, money. He thought of his poor ...
... was shy she hid her face on her mother's shoulder, and then looked doubtfully at Mrs. Ambrose, and then hid herself again. How old is your ...
... intended to be intimate he had offered to improve her cottage, had insisted upon making frames in her garden, had asked her to dinner with the Ambroses ...
... but not less strong, though Mrs. Ambrose said he was dreadfully pale-perhaps he owed some of the improvement observed in his appearance to the ...
... I think you had better take off your coat, he said. The house is very warm. Mrs. Goddard allowed the squire to help her in removing the heavy ...
... ever heard Greek. John cleared his throat and began, glancing at his hostess rather nervously from time to time. But his memory never failed ...