Cover of Second Plays

Second Plays

Auhtor: A Milne

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 8
eBook size: 422Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Second Plays':

Winning Ways for your Mathematical Plays (Academic Press 1982) by Elwyn R. Berlekamp John H. Conway and Richard K. Guy is a compendium of information on mathematical games. It was first published in 1982 in two volumes. The first volume introduces combinatorial game theory and its foundation in the surreal numbers partizan and impartial games Sprague-Grundy theory and misere games. The second volume applies the theorems of the first volume to many games including nim sprouts dots and boxes Sylver coinage philosophers football fox and geese. A final section on puzzles analyzes the Soma cube Rubiks Cube peg solitaire and Conways game of life. A republication of the work by A K Peters splits the content into four volumes.

Excerpts from the Book 'Second Plays':


... your father, Can't we christen her again? But there was nothing in the prayer book about it except riper years, and nobody seemed to know when riper ...
... about you- MELISANDE. I know. BOBBY. But I never told anybody else. MELISANDE. It wouldn't be necessary if you told Mother. ...
... friends, but there are some things that I could never tell even her. (Impressively) I could never show her my inmost heart. BOBBY. I don't ...
... out his dagger). Tell me their names that I may remove them for you. MELISANDE. There is one dressed in black and white who seeks to win ...
... Yes, why did he say that about my setting up house? JANE. I think he was just being funny. He is sometimes, you know. BOBBY. You don't ...
... Mr. Mallory. MR. KNOWLE. Well, come along. (As they go out) It is curious how much time one has to spend in saying How do you do and Good-bye. ...
... . . . Did you ever long when you were young to be wrecked on a desert island? MELISANDE (clasping her hands). Oh yes! GERVASE. You ...
... the gutter. STRANGER. That's right. LADY PEMBURY (pleadingly). Ah, but give him a chance! STRANGER. Now, look here, I've told you ...
... as it's raining, and JAMES is making her quite comfortable first with pens and ink and blotting-paper-always so important when one wants to ...
... I see, deep in our studies. And what branch of Knowledge are we pursuing this morning? OLIVER (without looking up). Marooned in the Pacific, ...
... of course. Well, you see, we land on the island, you see, and it's a perfectly ripping island, you see, and-and we land on it, you see, and. . . ...
... Jill! You may get up now and come down to tea. CHIEF. Having, as I say, slept off our carouse- GOVERNESS (off). Oliver! Jill! (She ...
... a gold watch and chain. He nods and holds up a diamond necklace) 'Ow's that? LIZ (starting suddenly). H'st! BILL (in a whisper). What is ...
... for his niece's hand. Isn't it exciting? You're really rather lucky, Mr. Pim-I mean being told so soon. Even Olivia doesn't know yet. PIM (getting ...
... You were so very unconventional when you married me, and you're so very conventional when Brian wants to marry Dinah. . . . George Marden to marry ...
... no claim at all, I'm afraid. I-I suppose I haven't. OLIVIA. I see. (She looks at him curiously) Thank you for making it so clear, George. ...
... wrong. (He is at the window as he says this.) OLIVIA (making her first and last appeal). George, aren't I worth a little- GEORGE (turning ...
... absorbed in her curtains. He walks up and down the room, fidgeting with things, waiting for her to speak. As she says nothing, he begins to talk himself, ...
... What is being done in Society just now? You must have heard a good deal of gossip about it. All your friends, who were also engaged on important ...
... Well? DENNIS. No, don't move. I just want to look at you. . . . I've seen you like that for four years. Don't move. . . . I've been ...