Cover of A Complete Account Of The Settlement At Port Jackson

A Complete Account Of The Settlement At Port Jackson

Auhtor: Watkin Tench

Language: english

Genres:

history
Downloads: 18
eBook size: 548Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Complete Account Of The Settlement At Port Jackson':

... new country, aggravated by the miseries of bad diet, and incessant toil, will find few admirers. Nor were our exertions less unsuccessful than they ...
... on board, he appeared neither afraid or ashamed of what he had done, but sat apart, melancholy and dispirited, and continued so until he saw the ...
... to the surrounding country (which is a very common custom) the squirrels, opossums, and other animals, who live in trees, flee for refuge into these ...
... against his competitors in arms, those of the tribe called Cameeragal in particular, would burst from him. And he never failed at such times to ...
... transports, having on board two companies of the New South Wales corps, arrived to add to our society. These ships also brought out a large body of convicts, ...
... was instructed to take her aside, and try if she could persuade her to comply with our wish. They wandered away together accordingly, but it was soon ...
... and April last), turned out very badly when I dug them about two months back. Wheat returned so poorly last harvest, that very little, besides Indian ...
... there is a house of lath and plaster, forty-four feet long by sixteen wide, for the governor, on a ground floor only, with excellent out-houses ...
... was seized. On being questioned with great seriousness, he, however, declared that he had never fired but once on a native, and then had not killed, ...
... the captive Indians, to be fastened under his arms. [*I had often read of this contrivance to facilitate the passage of a morass. But I confess, ...
... 1791. At twenty minutes before seven o'clock, we started from the governor's house at Rose Hill and steered* for a short time nearly in a north-east ...
... entertained, that this is a mark of subjection imposed by the tribe of Cameragal, (who are certainly the most powerful community in the country) on ...
... of the helplessness and dependance of our situation no rude curiosity to pry into the packages with which they were entrusted or no sordid desire to ...
... maize is a field of wheat, which looks tolerably for this part of the world. It will, I reckon, yield about twelve bushels an acre. Continued my walk ...
... a post of some respectability, and certainly one of importance to those who live here. His knowledge of men, particularly of that part of them into whose ...
... we found in general not a sufficiency, but torrents of water sometimes fall. Thunder storms, in summer, are common and very tremendous, but they have ...
... they always observe that if the snake bites them, they become lame, but whether by this they mean temporary or lasting lameness I do not pretend ...
... what is here advanced. It may be remarked, that when they attended at church with us (which was a common practice) they always preserved ound silence ...
... But even he has his hours of relaxation, in seasons of success, when fish abounds. Wanton with plenty, he now meditates an attack upon the chastity ...
... but afford satisfaction, to learn, that in a period of four years few crimes of a deep dye or of a hardened nature have been perpetrated. Murder and ...