Cover of A Narrative Of The Death Of Captain James Cook

A Narrative Of The Death Of Captain James Cook

Auhtor: David Samwell

Language: english
Published: 1786

Genres:

biography,  nautical
Downloads: 416
eBook size: 89Kb

Review by Dr. Bojan Tunguz, December 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Narrative Of The Death Of Captain James Cook':

A Narrative Of The Death Of Captain James Cook by David Samwell. Preface To those who have perused the account of the last voyage to the Pacific Ocean the following sheets may at first sight appear superfluous. The author however being of the opinion that the event of Captain Cook s death has not yet been so explicitly related as the importance of it required trusts that this Narrative will not be found altogether a repetition of what is already known. At the same time he wishes to add his humble testimony to the merit of the account given of this transaction by Captain King. Its brevity alone can afford an excuse for this publication the object of which is to give a more particular relation of that unfortunate affair which he finds is in general but imperfectly understood. He thinks himself warranted in saying this from having frequently observed that the public opinion seemed to attribute the loss of Captain Cook s life in some measure to rashness or too much confidence on his side whereas nothing can be more ill-founded or unjust. It is therefore a duty which his friends owe to his character to have the whole affair candidly and fully related whatever facts it may involve that may appear of a disagreeable nature to individuals. The author is confident that if Captain King could have foreseen that any wrong opinion respecting Captain Cook would have been the consequence of omitting some circumstances relative to his death the goodnatured motive that induced him to be silent would not have stood a moment in competition with the superior call of justice to the memory of his friend. This publication he is satisfied would not have been disapproved of by Captain King for whose memory he has the highest esteem and to whose friendship he is under many obligations. He is sanguine enough to believe that it will serve to remove a supposition in this single instance injurious to the memory of Captain Cook who was no less distinguished for his caution and prudence than for his eminent abilities and undaunted resolution. The late appearance of this Narrative has been owing to the peculiar situation of the writer whose domestic residence is at a great distance from the metropolis and whose duty frequently calls him from home for several months together. He has the pleasure of adding that in publishing the following account of Captain Cook s death he acts in concurrence with the opinion of some very respectable persons.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Narrative Of The Death Of Captain James Cook':


... the event of Captain Cook's death has not yet been so explicitly related as the importance of it required, trusts that this Narrative will not be found ...
... were universally treated by them with kind attention and hospitality but the respect they paid to Captain Cook, was little short of adoration. It was, ...
... part with it for nothing except iron daggers. These, the chiefs, some time before our departure, had preferred to every other article for having received ...
... which happened to be the lid of the water-cask. Having recovered these things, he was returning on board, when he was met by the Resolution's pinnace, ...
... would kill him for what had happened. They assured him of the contrary, and made signs of friendship to him in return. He then left them, and paddled ...
... them. At the same time, the third lieutenant of the Resolution, with the launch and small cutter, was sent on the same service, to the opposite ...
... out two or three times, and instead of returning any answer from the king, presented some pieces of red cloth to him, which made Captain Cook suspect ...
... their passage across: they had also delivered this account to each of the ships. Upon that information, the women, who were sitting upon the beach at ...
... back in a body, and seemed staggered but being pushed on by those behind, they returned to the charge, and poured a volley of stones among the marines, ...
... making for the pinnace, holding his left-hand against the back of his head, to guard it from the stones, and carrying his musket under the other ...
... his name in the journal I kept. I was induced to take particular notice of him, more from his personal appearance than any other consideration, though ...
... believe, that there was any thing of design, or a pre-concerted plan on their side, or that they purposely sought to quarrel with us: thieving, which ...
... of Whitby. The business is now carried on by the son of Mr. Saunderson, in the same shop, which I had the curiosity to visit about a year and a half ...
... ranked his name high as a navigator, and could not fail of recommending him to that great patron of naval merit, the Earl of Sandwich, who then presided ...
... him to pay an unwearied attention to every object of the service. The strict economy he observed in the expenditure of the ship's stores, and the ...
... a subject in some degree affecting the reputation of the late voyages to the South Sea Islands. If we for a moment suppose, that they have been the ...
... or no, so dreadful a calamity had been left at Atowai (Kauai) by our ships, and so propagated to these islands. But the scanty knowledge we had of ...
... indigenous among them, is what I do not pretend even to guess: but from the circumstances above-mentioned, I think myself warranted in saying, that ...
... 5, 6, 23. Keliikia (k), 14, 16. Keoua Kuahuula (k), 11. Keoua Peeale (k), 11, 12, 13. Keowa (see Keona Peeale). Kerag,e,goo,ah ...
... (unexpected and unforeseen). - Page 18, the the changed to the (towards the the navy). - Page 21, proscute changed to prosecute ...