Cover of A Tale Of Two Cities

A Tale Of Two Cities

Auhtor: Charles Dickens

Language: english
Published: 1859

Genres:

fiction,  historical
Downloads: 103
eBook size: 449Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Tale Of Two Cities':

A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is the second historical novel by Charles Dickens set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. It depicts the plight of the French proletariat under the brutal oppression of the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution and the corresponding savage brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution. It follows the lives of several protagonists through these events most notably Charles Darnay a French once-aristocrat who falls victim to the indiscriminate wrath of the revolution despite his virtuous nature and Sydney Carton a dissipated English barrister who endeavours to redeem his ill-spent life out of love for Darnays wife Lucie Manette.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Tale Of Two Cities':


... His linen, though not of a fineness in accordance with his stockings, was as white as the tops of the waves that broke upon the neighbouring beach, ...
... no feelings I am a mere machine. To go on- But this is my father's story, sir and I begin to think-the curiously roughened forehead was very intent ...
... It can't be. See what the prisoner is. These are not the hands she knew, this is not the face she knew, this is not a voice she ever heard. No, no. ...
... if statues were decreed in Britain, as in ancient Greece and Rome, to public benefactors, this shining citizen would assuredly have had one. That, ...
... room lined with books and littered with papers, where there was a blazing fire. A kettle steamed upon the hob, and in the midst of the wreck of papers ...
... deigning to look at the assemblage a second time, Monsieur the Marquis leaned back in his seat, and was just being driven away with the air of a gentleman ...
... a daughter? Yes. Yes, said the Marquis. You are fatigued. Good night! As he bent his head in his most courtly manner, there was a secrecy in ...
... should have committed myself to that extent. Mr. Lorry, you cannot control the mincing vanities and giddinesses of empty-headed girls you must not ...
... in which he ought to have been perfect by that time, seeing that it had been the infallible resource and indispensable entertainment of his village ...
... that is enough. She roiled up her knitting when she had said those words, and presently took the rose out of the handkerchief that was wound about ...
... of her faith in this lost man, that her husband could have looked at her as she was for hours. And, O my dearest Love! she urged, clinging nearer ...
... screeching at him all the time, and the men sternly calling out to have him killed with grass in his mouth. Once, he went aloft, and the rope ...
... to the ground. The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, ...
... knew now. He could not but admit to himself that he might not have made this journey, if he could have foreseen the events of a few days. And yet ...
... name of the strong man of Old Scripture had descended to the chief functionary who worked it but, so armed, he was stronger than his namesake, and blinder, ...
... about him, and casting up to sight from the stormy deep such wrecks of faces, that he more than once misdoubted his mind being in confusion, and that ...
... short examination followed, for the court was quick with its work. You did good service at the taking of the Bastille, citizen? I believe so. Here, ...
... together as they have fallen out. it was the always-vain endeavour to discharge my poor mother's trust that first brought my fatal presence near ...
... feet. As he did so, a small case in which the Doctor was accustomed to carry the lists of his day's duties, fell lightly on the floor. Carton took ...
... my words be took down and took to Mrs. Cruncher through yourself-that wot my opinions respectin' flopping has undergone a change, and that wot ...