Cover of A Narrative Of The Shipwreck

A Narrative Of The Shipwreck

Auhtor: Horace Holden

Language: english
Published: 1836

Genres:

adventure,  nautical,  history
Downloads: 71
eBook size: 158Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Narrative Of The Shipwreck':

... that subject by H. Holden:-. In addition to the gentlemen mentioned in the Narrative, we are under great obligations to Mr. Stephen Oliphant and his ...
... dashing over and around us with tremendous violence. At this awful moment I was in my berth, in the steerage. When the ship struck the third time, ...
... there might be some chance of rescuing him from the waves. They were furnished with the necessary nautical instruments, log-book, a bag of clothing, ...
... and a tinder-box. In this frail bark, and with these poor means of subsistence and defence, with little to rely upon but the mercy of Providence, ...
... render us some assistance by towing our boat and after some deliberation we concluded to throw them a line. This greatly facilitated our progress, as ...
... canoe containing two living beings, in the form of men, in a state of nakedness, was seen, from where we sat, putting off from a point of ...
... of the group of the Pelew islands. It lies not far from the eighth degree of north latitude, is about one hundred and twenty miles in length, and contains ...
... the performance of so noble a deed. Finding it important to be able to converse with the natives, we improved every opportunity to become acquainted ...
... in the belief that they should succeed, and repeatedly assured us that they could accomplish the work. Their sorrow and mortification, on being obliged ...
... and being mutually desirous to be rid of each other's company, we lost no time in preparing for our departure. Our object now was to get into the open ...
... board seemed inevitable. Fortunately we continued to keep company. By great exertion we made out to replace the rudder in the morning, and then proceeded. ...
... quarter of the world.[4] Like many other islands in those seas, this is surrounded by a coral reef, which is from an eighth to one half of a mile wide ...
... reach down to their waist. Their mode of salutation is, to clasp each other in their arms, and touch their noses together, as is practised in many other ...
... best we could get no more than a small piece of cocoa-nut, hardly a common sized mouthful, at a time, and if, either from exhaustion or any other cause, ...
... but having teeth, instead of a smooth, sharp edge. This instrument was held within an inch or two of the flesh, and struck into it rapidly with ...
... were, for a long time, running sores and when exposed to the sun, the pain was excruciating. It has been already said, that the natives were indolent, ...
... to prepare for visiting the vessel and throwing our emaciated bodies into their canoes, we made for the ship with all possible despatch. The vessel proved ...
... adopted is that of the English language it being the most useful to such of our navigators as may chance to visit Lord North's island or those in its ...
... they wish to express a larger number they do it by a repetition of the syllable saik, (ten,) in this manner:-sakum ah saik, ah saik, ah saik, &c. In ...
... and cocoa-nuts, and women, and a great many men and children. P. Gur mukkah woar Inglish pee?pee. P. Do you eat in England a plenty. H. Eelah, ...