Cover of A Protest by Russian Social Democrats

A Protest by Russian Social Democrats

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1910

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 289
eBook size: 367Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Protest by Russian Social Democrats':

Every revolution begins at the top as the ruling class with no clear way forward split over what course of action to take. In January 1916 a strike wave developed against food shortages and speculators. Feeling the movement building up from below a section of the ruling class favored making limited concessions. During late 1916 the mystic monk Rasputin was murdered and plots were laid for a palace coup to remove the Tsar and the Tsarina. The signs of splits in the ruling class opened the floodgates of revolution. The tensions brought about by the war of five million dead or wounded of the armys bread ration being cut by a third between December 1916 and February 1917 of the shortages of food in the towns burst to the surface. The February Revolution began on the 23rd (dates are on the old Russian calendar add 13 days for the modern calendar) with a strike by women textile workers in Petrograd. On International Womens Day 90000 were on strike including many soldiers wives. They marched to the Duma (a truncated parliament) demanding bread which as Trotsky commented was like demanding milk from a he-goat. On the following day half of the industrial workers of Petrograd joined the strike. As the strikes grew the slogans rapidly changed to directly political challenges to the regime: Down with the aristocracy! Down with the war! Yet none of the workers organizations initially called for the strikes. Indeed the most brilliant Bolshevik organization the committee in the industrial Vyborg area feeling the tension but not believing the time was right for an insurrection which they saw could develop from the strikes initially opposed the call for strikes on February 23. Thus one of the most oppressed and least organized layers perhaps not as burdened by consideration of where their strike could lead but burning with desire to take action opened the floodgates of revolution. The police tried to break up the crowds aided by Cossacks (cavalry) some mounted police and occasionally by infantry. The crowds fought the police but tried to neutralize the Cossacks and win over the soldiers in action. On the 25th cadet officers fired on demonstrating workers killing 16. On the 27th there were further demonstrations and troops were called out to suppress them. After clashed with the workers the troops began to mutiny. In some places the workers had succeeded in uniting with the soldiers penetrating the barracks and receiving rifles.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Protest by Russian Social Democrats':


... Translated by Joe Fineberg and by George Hanna Edited by Victor Jerome Public Domain: Lenin Internet Archive (2000). You may freely copy, ...
... to membership in organisations, mutual benefit societies, religious societies, etc. This spirit of organisation is still alive among the skilled workers ...
... period of development of the labour movement from the Communist Mnnifesto to Bernsteinism, and a careful study of this whole process can determine with ...
... also for their own development, but they are systematically stifled and cannot give forth even weak shoots. If to this we add that the working class ...
... to organise, and coming into constant connict with the political regime in the course of it, the Russian worker will at last create what may be called ...
... a 'negator,' the Russian Marxist came on the scene very early, and this negation has weakened the share of his energy that should be turned in the direction ...
... party. Marxism linked up the economic and the political struggle of the working class into a single inseparable whole and the effort of the authors ...
... recognised by Marxism from the very outset. As early as the forties Marx and Engels conducted a polemic against the utopian socialists who denied the ...
... reformist social tinkering (anarchism, utopian and petty-bourgeois socialism, state socialism, professorial socialism, etc.). The proletariat must ...
... reject this distortion of the fundamental principles of Social-Democracy. Their erroneous premises regarding the West-European working-class movement ...
... idea, an idea running counter to Social-Democracy, that the economic basis of the movement may be obscured by the effort to keep the political ...
... of the organised working masses. Hence it follows that the motto of Social-Democracy must be: aid to the workers, not only in their economic, but also ...
... but also of democratic ideas. Only the theory of revolutionary Marxism can be the banner of the class movement of the workers, and Russian Social-Democracy ...
... at the time a member of the Union of Russian Social-Democrats Abroad. The manifesto of the group of economists was not intended for the press ...
... reprinted the Protest in the Vademecum, a collection of essays against the economists. Plekhanov welcomed the appearance of the Protest ...
... International) -the First international organisation of the proletariat, founded by Karl Marx in 1864 at an international workers' meeting convened ...
... the Gotha Programme (see Marx and Engels, Selected Works, Vol. II, Moscow, 1958, pp. 25-26). ? ?[p.177] ? [66] The North-Russian Workers' Union, ...
... the first workers' revolutionary political organisation in Russia. The Union was suppressed by the tsarist government after having been in existence for ...
... Central Committee, adopted Rabochaya Gazeta as the official organ of the Party, published a Manifesto and declared the Union of Russian Social-Democrats ...
... Narodnaya Volya was organised under the leadership of A. I. Ulyanov (Lenin's brother) and P. Y. Shevyrev. After an unsuccessful attempt on the life ...