Cover of A Treatise On The Tactical Use Of The Three Arms

A Treatise On The Tactical Use Of The Three Arms

Auhtor: Francis Lippitt

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 85
eBook size: 107Kb

Review by Daniel G. Lebryk, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Treatise On The Tactical Use Of The Three Arms':

... skirmishers occupy every favorable point for holding the enemy in check. D. RULES FOR INDIVIDUAL SKIRMISHERS. 1. In advancing, in ...
... a battery should avail itself of all inequalities of the ground, for the shelter of its pieces and gunners, or of its limbers and caissons, ...
... section or battery should never consist of howitzers alone, for the proper fire of these pieces is too slow to be effective in repulsing an attack ...
... cover, natural or artificial, or by troops placed in front of them. The surprise will add much to their effect. Moreover, concealed, they will be ...
... being carried forward by the pressure of the ranks behind, continues to rush on till the battery is carried, though with more or less loss. At ...
... Three Arms VI.-Its Fire. 1. It is important not to commence the fire till our guns are in sure range- (1.) Because a harmless fire ...
... its scattering, its effect is superior to it. The fire of guns double shotted with ball and a stand of grape, is fearfully destructive when used ...
... 1. A part of our cavalry must be so posted as to secure our flanks remaining in column behind the wings, till the enemy's movements require its ...
... seen that, although cavalry may carry a position, it cannot hold it, if attacked by infantry. When used for such a purpose, therefore, it should ...
... of Rocroi. 7. Deployed as skirmishers, by their noise, dust, and smoke, cavalry may furnish a good screen for our movements. 8. Cavalry ...
... and was carrying all before him, when he pushed on to the village of Gulden Gossa, where the ground had not been reconnoitred, and could not be ...
... the last is undoubtedly the worst possible for- (1.) On arriving at the enemy, the troops are not concentrated at the point where the ...
... as in flank marching in the field, especially when the ground is ragged or obstructed, distances cannot be preserved. It may be here remarked, ...
... that is, their weapons are larger and heavier than those of light cavalry, and to these weapons, carbines, in most of the corps, are added. Some of ...
... defect, the highest offensive power of infantry being in the bayonet. Fire, in the attack, is generally ineffective, and sometimes injurious. It should ...
... 4. In ordinary cases, the charge should be prepared by first shattering the hostile masses, or, at least, wearying and demoralizing them by artillery, ...
... followed up by a countercharge with the bayonet on the charging enemy. For, if our fire has staggered him, a vigorous charge will complete ...
... the main body, meanwhile, occupying the most sheltered locality it can find. 2. Where no shelter is afforded by any natural obstacles, or ...
... points of concentration, he accordingly ordered his columns to halt each day, to practise the three movements which he considered to be the most ...
... wanting.Maurice Baring : CC Traps and Pitfalls is a slim computer programming book by former AT&T researcher and programmer Andrew Koenig, ...