Cover of A Critical Examination Of Socialism

A Critical Examination Of Socialism

Auhtor: William Hurrell Mallock

Language: english
Published: 1908

Genres:

politics
Downloads: 74
eBook size: 520Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Critical Examination Of Socialism':

... Marx, the capitalist is sure to interpose with the objection that the increased output of wealth is due, not to labour, but to the machinery, and that ...
... and preposterous millionaires on the one hand, and a mass of miserable ragamuffins who provided all the millions on the other, having for themselves only ...
... to be engaged. The directive faculties are the mind or the brain of one man simultaneously affecting the hands of any number of other men, and through ...
... time to the proprietor of a factory to-day, the entire use of wage-capital would in his case be gone. The same thing is true of slavery. Like the peasant ...
... from the labour in the direction of which it has been expended. Thus a man, we will say, invents a new engine for motor-cars, and devotes to ...
... But the successes of the ablest men would have no tendency to self-extension. The ablest men would do better than the less able, but would have no ...
... merges the organism in its environment, or the individual, however great, in society, has been seized on by the more recent socialists just as ...
... valour or his unselfish devotion to his country. Now, that the motives here in question are motives of extraordinary power, all history shows us. The ...
... and confine it within certain channels. This is what X and similar thinkers forget and the nature of their error is very pertinently illustrated ...
... it. And this fact brings us back to our own more immediate subject-namely, the power of the few and of the many in the sphere of economic production. ...
... his clerical brethren is precisely what he urges on behalf of the less competent majority generally. Neither on them nor on the Christian clergy does ...
... in so far as that programme is peculiar. It is necessary to note this because, as a matter of fact, with such of their arguments as are proper to socialism ...
... which of its parts or how much of its value were due to the man directing, and which or how much were due to the men directed. But if for one year ...
... in its typical form and interest is the gift of nature to the man by whom the capital is owned. George, however, is constrained to supplement this ...
... is some constant and sufficient reason. Now, the only reason can be-and George's own criticism implies this-that in order to produce the machine-capital ...
... would pass on them, and say of the one that he had acted as his own best friend, and dismiss the other as nobody's enemy but his own. But we are, ...
... our author's language, one would suppose that modern capital was made up entirely of separate little implements like sewing-machines, and that every ...
... the individual's congenital temperament, his talents, his strength of will, and the vividness or vagueness of his imagination. Education, understood in ...
... thought but the first and the third have no necessary connection with socialism, and the second is not peculiar to it. We will now return to it ...
... De arte honeste amandi, for which a possible English translation is The Art of Courtly Love (though the book's realistic, somewhat cynical tone suggests ...