Cover of A Collection Of Ballads

A Collection Of Ballads

Auhtor: Andrew Lang

Language: english

Genres:

poetry
Downloads: 176
eBook size: 388Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Collection Of Ballads':

A Collection of Old Ballads is an anonymous book published 1723 - 1725 in three volumes in London by Roberts and Leach. It was the second major collection of British folksongs to be published following Pills To Purge Melancholy (published 1719 - 1720). Ambrose Phillips was once credited as the editor but this has since been challenged. Volume one contained Chevy Chase Queen Eleanors Confession The Suffolk Miracle and Bonny Dundee. The preface to volume two notes that readers had responded to volume one by sending some rare songs to the editor. It has fewer genuine folksongs than the first volume and instead has some obvious literary concoctions. It has The Merchants Son and Beggar Wench of Hull (a prototype of New York Girls) The Wind Has Blown my Plaid Away The Bonny Grey-Eyed Morn and 3 Robin Hood Ballads. The third volume is the poorest with long historical songs about the kings of England obviously not taken from the folk tradition. The Baffled Knight (Child Ballad 4) is genuine and there is even a whaling song The Greenland Voyage. There are a few Scottish items - The Broom of Cowdenknowes Bessy Bell ands Mary Gray Muirland Willie and The Gaberlunzie Man. The collection also includes The Merchant and the Beggar Maid and An Thou Were My Ain Thing (later recorded by Maddy Prior). Within a year of the publication of volume one Allan Ramsay was inspired to publish his Tea-Table Miscellany (1724) in Edinburgh. A Collection of Old Ballads is the first printed collection to aim for songs that were genuinely old folksongs but there are no tunes to the 159 texts. In a few cases the names of tunes are indicated.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Collection Of Ballads':


... Gross. The Heir Of Lynne. Gordon Of Brackley. Edward, Edward. Young Benjie. Auld Maitland. The Broomfield Hill. Willie's Ladye. Robin ...
... Perhaps the editor may be allowed to say that he does not merely plough with Professor Child's heifer, but has made a study of ballads from his boyhood. This ...
... a willow wand,. That would never hae been a tree, O.. What death dost thou desire to die. Son Davie. Son Davie. What death dost thou desire ...
... so on me. O, I am going to Edinburgh town,. A rich wedding for to see.. When she gaed up the Tolbooth stairs,. The corks frae her heels did flee. And ...
... flung him down upon the lead:. Had there not been peace between our lands,. Upon the other side thou hadst gaed. Now sound out, trumpets. ...
... daughter of thine. Was married to a lord under night. Rise up, rise up, my seven bold sons,. And put on your armour so bright,. And take better ...
... he says,. Or will ye be my honey. Or will ye be my wedded wife. For I love you best of any.. I winna gae wi' you, she says,. Nor will ...
... granted never a traitor's life,. And now I'll not begin with thee.. Grant me my life, my liege, my king. And a bonnie gift I'll gi'e to ...
... I will bake your bridal bread,. And brew your bridal ale,. And I will welcome your brisk bride,. That you bring oer the dale.. But ...
... her that's new come hame.. When bells were rung, and mass was sung,. And a' men bound to bed,. Lord Thomas and his new-come bride. To ...
... ransom is remeidyless. And thair the knicht of Lawriston. Was slain into his armour schene,. And gude Sir Robert Davidson,. Wha provost was ...
... slew them a' the road. On Monanday, at mornin,. The battle it began,. On Saturday at gloamin',. Ye'd scarce kent wha had wan. An sic ...
... gang yee. For if we should hang some land selfeer,. The first we would begin with thee.. Now well-a-day. said the heire of Lynne,. Now ...
... has kill'd our ae sister. And how can he be found. The night it is her low lykewake,. The morn her burial day. And we maun watch at mirk midnight,. And ...
... shape it bairn and bairnly like,. And in it two glassen een you'll put. Oh, wha has loosed the nine witch-knots. That were amang that ladye's ...
... oure kynge,. How Robyn Hode was gone,. And how the scheref of Notyngham. Durst neuer loke hyme vpone. Then bespake oure cumly kynge,. In an ...
... bred and ale and weyne,. To the bottys they made them prest,. With bowes and boltys full feyne. The screffes men schot foll fast,. As archares ...
... were routed with heavy loss. Douglas was buried in Melrose Abbey very many years later the English defiled his grave, but were punished at Ancram ...
... of the affair of Kinmont Willie on a pre-existing ballad of that name, or the ballad printed by Scott is based on the prose narrative of Scott of Satchells. ...
... in his Palice of Honour, which the Shepherd can hardly have read, and Scott identified this Maitland with the ancestor of Lethington his date ...