Cover of A Comparison of the Stolypin and the Narodnik Agrarian Programmes

A Comparison of the Stolypin and the Narodnik Agrarian Programmes

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1919

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 207
eBook size: 237Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Comparison of the Stolypin and the Narodnik Agrarian Programmes':

Returning to Russia on April 3 Lenin arrived in Petrograd during the All-Russian Conference of Bolshevik Party Workers. In his first address to the delegates he advocated uncompromising opposition to the war and the Provisional Government and irreconcilable hostility toward all supporters of both he proposed that the party struggle for the establishment of a proletarian dictatorship. At the same time he declared that the Bolsheviks who were a small minority confronted a task not of the immediate seizure of power but of patient propaganda to convince a majority of the workers of the soundness of Bolshevik policy. Opposed at first by virtually the entire Bolshevik leadership Lenin quickly succeeded in converting the party to his course. Bolshevik policy was thereafter directed toward the assumption of full power by the soviets immediate termination of the war planned and organized seizure of the land by the peasants and control by the workers of industrial production. Bolshevik propaganda themes were exemplified in the slogans Peace Land Bread and All Power to the Soviets. The exiled revolutionary Leon Trotsky who arrived in Petrograd in May from America agreed with Lenins policy and joined the Bolshevik Party. Developments favored the Bolshevik cause. On April 18 Milyukov sent a note to the Allied governments promising to continue the war to a victorious conclusion in ambiguous language the note also pledged his support of the Provisional Government to a policy of annexing foreign territory and imposing indemnities on defeated nations. This pronouncement in sharp contrast with the earlier declaration to the people of the whole world issued by the Petrograd Soviet on March 14 calling for peace without annexations and indemnities provoked armed demonstrations of protest by workers and soldiers in the capital. Contrary to the proposal of General Lavr Georgiyevich Kornilov to quell the demonstrations by force the Petrograd Soviet which assumed sole command of the garrison of the capital ordered all troops to remain in their barracks. As a result of the political crisis Milyukov and Guchkov resigned and the government was reorganized on May 5 to include representatives of the socialist parties which received 6 of the 15 portfolios Kerensky became minister of war.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Comparison of the Stolypin and the Narodnik Agrarian Programmes':


... Lenin Internet Archive (2000). You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please ...
... medievalism in landownership. ? ? The contradiction between capitalism, which prevails throughout the world, including Russia, and medieval landownership, ...
... but this opposition does not remove the one fundamental point which the two programmes have in common, namely, the fact that both recognise the necessity ...
... ? ? Such is the meaning of the Stolypin agrarian programme. The Council of the United Nobility, which entrusted Stolypin with drafting it, ...
... And indeed, after 1905 it became obvious that the police and the bureaucracy alone were inadequate as a protection against the peasants. ? ? Where ...
... landownership in our favour and for the benefit of the new landlords - that is the gist of the agrarian policy which the Council of the United Nobility ...
... possibility from the angle of the general conditions of capitalist economy throughout the world. You will see that our suggested reform would ...
... renting of land is even more convenient for pure capitalism, for the fullest, freest, and most ideal adaptation to the market, than is ownership of ...
... is why Britain is not an exception among the capitalist countries, but is the country that, from the point of view of capitalism, has the most perfect ...
... world capitalism, the greater the effort it must make to overtake its neighbours, the more it has neglected its disease, the disease of medieval ...
... rise and wide dissemination in that country, among its agricultural population, of all sorts of ideas and plans of land nationalisation. ? ? ...
... necessarily born of the struggle against the survivals of serfdom and inevitably transplanted to the land in a situation where 30,000 residual serf-owners ...
... about the transfer of the first category of land into the second category, or rather to the owners of this second category. What is utopian is ...
... system it would consist in the freest adaptation of the new system of land tenure and landownership to the new conditions of the world market. ? ...
... between the present social-estate and category forms of landownership being broken up. It would be a tre- ? mendous gain for the whole national ...
... the market. ? ? Departition the land, I recall a Left Narodnik saying in the Second Duma. He fancied that the result would be equalised land ...
... church, etc., etc., landownership, and is aware of the necessity of breaking down all those partitions to make way for a new distribution ...
... programmes lies in the fact that both advocate a radical break-up of the old, medieval system of landownership. And that is very good. That system ...
... Note: See Lenin's The Last Valve. - DJR] NOTES ? [90] See Karl Marx, Theories of Surplus Value, Vol. II, Part ...
... Ilyich Lenin : A Fly in the OintmentVladimir Ilyich Lenin : A German Voice on the WarVladimir Ilyich Lenin : A Characterisation of Economic ...