Cover of A Fairy Tale In Two Acts Taken From Shakespeare

A Fairy Tale In Two Acts Taken From Shakespeare

Auhtor: William Shakespeare

Language: english
Published: 1763

Genres:

drama,  poetry
Downloads: 446
eBook size: 272Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Fairy Tale In Two Acts Taken From Shakespeare':

Sir Thomas More (February 7 1478 - July 6 1535) also Saint Thomas More was an English lawyer social philosopher author statesman and noted Renaissance humanist. He was an important counsellor to Henry VIII of England and for three years toward the end of his life he was Lord Chancellor. He is also recognized as a saint within the Catholic Church and in the Anglican Communion. He was an opponent of the Protestant Reformation and of Martin Luther and William Tyndale. More coined the word utopia - a name he gave to the ideal imaginary island nation whose political system he described in Utopia published in 1516. He opposed the kings separation from the papal church and denied that the king was the Supreme Head of the Church of England a status the king had been given by a compliant parliament through the Act of Supremacy of 1534. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1534 for his refusal to take the oath required by the First Succession Act because the act disparaged the power of the Pope and Henry?s marriage to Catherine of Aragon. In 1535 he was tried and executed for treason by beheading. More was beatified by the Catholic Church in 1886 and canonised with John Fisher in 1935. In 1980 he was added to the Church of Englands calendar of saints.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Fairy Tale In Two Acts Taken From Shakespeare':


... Mr. Love. Bottom, the Weaver, Mr. Baddely. Snug, the Joiner, Mr. Clough. Flute, the Bellows-mender, Mr. Castle. Snout, ...
... First, good Peter Quince, say what the play treats on then read the names of the actors and so grow on to a point. Quin. Marry, our play ...
... Robin Starveling, you must play Thisby's mother:. Tom Snowt, the tinker. Snowt. Here, Peter Quince. Quin. You, Pyramus's father myself, ...
... day a most lovely gentleman-like man: therefore you must needs play Pyramus. Bot. Well, I will undertake it. What beard were I best to play it ...
... Peter Quince. [Quince blows. Bot. Now make your reverency and begin. SONG-for Epilogue. By Quince, Bottom, Snug, Flute, Starveling, ...
... park, over pale,. Through flood, through fire,. I do wander every where,. Swifter than the moon's sphere. And I serve the Fairy Queen,. To ...
... her beguile. In very likeness of a roasted crab. And when she drinks, against her lips I bob,. And on her wither'd dewlap pour the ale. The ...
... you come. To give their bed joy and prosperity. Ob. How canst thou thus, for shame, Titania,. Glance at my credit with Hippolita,. Knowing ...
... th' embarked traders of the flood,. When we have laught to see the sails conceive,. And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind. Which ...
... of love. And ere I take this charm off from her sight,. (As I can take it with another herb),. I'll make her render up her page to me. [Exit. SCENE ...
... eye what shall appear,. When thou wak'st, it is thy dear. Wake when some vile thing is near. [Exit Ob. AIR. 1st Fai. Such the force of Magic ...
... them out of fear. Quin. Well, we will have such a prologue, and it shall be written in eight and six. Bot. No, make it two more let it be written ...
... not a more fearful wildfowl than your Lion, living and we ought to look to it. Snout. Therefore another prologue must tell he is not a Lion. Bot. ...
... the Fairy Queen. What, a play tow'rd I'll be an auditor. An actor too, perhaps, if I see cause. Quin. Speak, Pyramus. Thisby, stand forth. Pyr. ...
... a fire,. And neigh, and bark, and grunt, and roar, and burn,. Like horse, hound, hog, bear, fire, at every turn. [Exit. Enter Bottom. Bot. ...
... And I. Must. And I. Where shall we go. Queen. Be kind and courteous to this Gentleman. Hop in his walks, and gambol in his eyes. Feed him with ...
... and town,. We will trip it up and down. [Exit Oberon. SCENE The Wood and Bower. Enter Queen of Fairies, Bottom Fairies attending and the King ...
... now I do begin to pity:. For meeting her of late behind the wood,. I then did ask of her her changeling child,. Which strait she gave me wherefore ...
... not inconstant ever,. One foot on sea, and one on shore,. You can be happy never. [Lark sings. Puck. Fairy king, attend and mark,. I ...
... the lady.-v. 6. The moonstone, pt. 1.-v. 7. The... >>read more<