Cover of A March On London

A March On London

Auhtor: G Henty

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 396
eBook size: 320Kb

Review by Dr. Bojan Tunguz, March 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A March On London':

A March On London by G A Henty. An excerpt And what do you think of it all good Father Tis a difficult question my son and I am glad that it is one that wiser heads than mine will have to solve. But they don t seem to try to solve it things get worse and worse. The king is but a lad no older than myself and he is in the hands of others. It seems to me a sin and a shame that things should go on as they are at present. My father also thinks so. The speaker was a boy of some sixteen years old. He was walking with the prior in the garden of the little convent of St. Alwyth four miles from the town of Dartford. Edgar Ormskirk was the son of a scholar. The latter a man of independent means who had always had a preference for study and investigation rather than for taking part in active pursuits had since the death of his young wife a year after the birth of his son retired altogether from the world and devoted himself to study. He had given up his comfortable home standing on the heights of Highgate--that being in too close proximity to London to enable him to enjoy the seclusion that he desired--and had retired to a small estate near Dartford.

Excerpts from the Book 'A March On London':


... part of the gathering had left to follow the king, they had taken advantage of it to press forward towards the gates, and in a few minutes were inside ...
... who have taken a leading part in them will be punished, yet in the end it will be seen that it were best that these things that they now ask for should ...
... out of their wits and if they have troubled him, which is like enough, I will warrant that he has given them as great a scare as we have given these ...
... is no hurry, Albert. The messenger must have ridden from town to- day, and as he went first to Master Ormskirk's, that would lengthen his journey ...
... for that affair that the king said he knighted us, Sir Robert, Edgar said. The other matters were private ventures, though against the king's enemies ...
... and had long and earnest talk with them upon the situation. Late in the afternoon he sent a letter to Philip Van Artevelde, saying that he had ...
... the march proceeded, Edgar and Albert requested Van Artevelde to give them leave to ride with their four men across the country, and to take with ...
... take hints from others, and he simply replied, carelessly, I have no doubt that my orders have been strictly carried out, sir knight, and rode forward ...
... Ghent, whom he always kept near his person, as he had but little faith in the goodwill of those from other towns. Beyond these were the contingents ...
... to come down into some house which was either uninhabited, or where the people were friendly. Still that would not be absolutely necessary, ...
... a condition of our release that we should take no further part in the campaign, and as we were returning in consequence, Sir Hugh committed to us ...
... me very great pleasure to prepare this little surprise for you. I pray you, do not mar it in any way by returning me thanks. The gift is as naught ...
... The Prior smiled quietly at the thought of the sturdy, dirty-faced boy working among crucibles and retorts. However, he only said: Do ...
... but I would grant them a charter giving them far greater rights than at present. A fifteenth of their labour is as much as they should be called ...
... I would not that he should attach himself to Lancaster's faction or to Gloucester's, for both are ambitious, and it will be a struggle between them ...
... barbarous country. I was afraid of that when I wrote to you, Sir Ralph laughed, and felt that your coming up would cause me to open my purse ...
... make the preparations? A proclamation was drawn up by the council, warning all to return to their homes on pain of punishment, and promising an inquiry ...
... with a wounded man, who, with his daughter, have been beset by knaves within a hundred yards of your door. Some bolts were undrawn after some ...
... of the king yielding to these knaves and placing himself in their power, but the archbishop of Canterbury, and Hales the treasurer, and I, withstood ...
... thus closing the stairway, not only would it baffle them did they find the entrance above, but it would prevent any fire reaching here. The staircase ...