Cover of The Uncommercial Traveller

The Uncommercial Traveller

Auhtor: Charles Dickens

Language: english
Published: 1860

Genres:

non-fiction
Downloads: 105
eBook size: 434Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'The Uncommercial Traveller':

The Uncommercial Traveller is a collection of literary sketches and reminiscences written by Charles Dickens.In 1859 Dickens founded a new journal called All the Year Round and the Uncommercial Traveller articles would be among his main contributions. He seems to have chosen the title and persona of the Uncommercial Traveller as a result of a speech he gave on the 22 December 1859 to the Commercial Travellers School London in his role as honorary chairman and treasurer. The persona sits well with a writer who liked to travel not only as a tourist but also to research and report what he found visiting Europe America and giving book readings throughout Britain.Dickens began by writing seventeen episodes which were printed in All the Year Round between 28 January and 13 October 1860 and these were published in a single edition in 1861. He sporadically produced eleven more articles between 1863-65 and an expanded edition of the work was printed in 1866. Once more he returned to the persona with some more sketches written 1868-69 and a complete set of these articles was published posthumously in 1875.

Excerpts from the Book 'The Uncommercial Traveller':


... the marks upon the linen were sometimes inconsistent with one another and thus he came to understand that they had dressed in great haste and agitation, ...
... the agreeable fact. In an allegorical way, which did as well as any other way, we and the Spirit of Liberty got into a kingdom of Needles and Pins, ...
... lately, and I very seldom have blown to any English place in my life, where I could get anything good to eat and drink in five minutes, or ...
... white wine-glass, a green wine-glass, a blue finger-glass, a tumbler, and a powerful field battery of fourteen casters with nothing in them or at all ...
... once carried by four somebodys, I suppose, before somebody else, but which there is nobody now to hold or receive honour from. I open the door of ...
... as you leave him behind. Towards the end of the same walk, on the same bright summer day, at the corner of the next little town or village, ...
... happen never to have asked yourself whether his uniform is suited to his work, perhaps the poor fellow's appearance as he comes distressfully towards ...
... keeping awake, and how intensely wretched and horrible they were rendering the small hours to unfortunate suitors. Westminster Abbey was fine gloomy ...
... set sail that very night, and she sailed, and sailed, and sailed. Chips's feelings were dreadful. Nothing ever equalled his terrors. No wonder. At last, ...
... had no need to tell me it would be happiness to him to die for his benefactor I doubt if I ever saw real, sterling, fervent gratitude of soul, before ...
... in the public eye, and those next the gates beat at them impatiently, as if they were of the cannibal species and hungry. Again the hinges creaked, ...
... unfortunate, but has certainly been similar. I have an illustrative birthday in my eye: a birthday of my friend Flipfield, whose birthdays had long ...
... of the Ship). That is me, sir. INSPECTOR. Going alone, Anastatia? ANASTATIA (shaking her curls). I am with Mrs. Jobson, sir, but I've got separated ...
... length, and upside down-as a Dolphin is always bound to be when artistically treated, though I suppose he is sometimes right side upward in his natural condition-graced ...
... It is unreasonable, because any one at all experienced in such things knows that the drunken workman does not get drunk where he goes to eat and drink, ...
... or I might have fired for prizes at a multitude of little dolls in niches, and might have hit the doll of dolls, and won francs and fame. Or, being a ...
... even take their stations and light up their smoky lamps before the iron railings, Titbull's becomes flurried. Mrs. Saggers has her celebrated palpitations ...
... too, arise (the voice never silent all the while, but marvellously suggestive) of the gulf below of the strange, unfruitful mountain ...
... east of London. I came away from Ratcliff by the Stepney railway station to the terminus at Fenchurch Street. Any one who will reverse that route may ...
... weeping wretch, and fifty like it, but of both sexes, were about me in a moment, begging, tumbling, fighting, clamouring, yelling, shivering in their nakedness ...