Cover of A Woman Will

A Woman Will

Auhtor: Anne Warner

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 398
eBook size: 440Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Woman Will':

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects written by the eighteenth-century British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy. In it Wollstonecraft responds to those educational and political theorists of the eighteenth century who did not believe women should have an education. She argues that women ought to have an education commensurate with their position in society claiming that women are essential to the nation because they educate its children and because they could be companions to their husbands rather than mere wives. Instead of viewing women as ornaments to society or property to be traded in marriage Wollstonecraft maintains that they are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men. Wollstonecraft was prompted to write the Rights of Woman after reading Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigords 1791 report to the French National Assembly which stated that women should only receive a domestic education she used her commentary on this specific event to launch a broad attack against sexual double standards and to indict men for encouraging women to indulge in excessive emotion. Wollstonecraft wrote the Rights of Woman hurriedly in order to respond directly to ongoing events she intended to write a more thoughtful second volume but she died before completing it. While Wollstonecraft does call for equality between the sexes in particular areas of life such as morality she does not explicitly state that men and women are equal. Her ambiguous statements regarding the equality of the sexes have since made it difficult to classify Wollstonecraft as a modern feminist particularly since the word and the concept were unavailable to her. Although it is commonly assumed now that the Rights of Woman was unfavourably received this is a modern misconception based on the belief that Wollstonecraft was as reviled during her lifetime as she became after the publication of William Godwins Memoirs of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798). The Rights of Woman was actually well-received when it was first published in 1792. One biographer has called it perhaps the most original book of Wollstonecrafts Wollstonecrafts century.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Woman Will':


... Nine I shall certainly not tell Molly one word about these latest developments, Rosina said firmly to herself, and she remade the ...
... You never did ask me 'might you?' she replied. He drew two or three satisfied puffs. It is good to be so friends, he commented ...
... where did who buy what? The monkey. Oh! I don't know, I'm sure. Then there was another long silence. To-morrow, he announced, ...
... the Bavarian shades, she said thoughtfully, I want to meet King Louis more than any one else. I think that he is the most interesting figure ...
... kind myself. Not as I tie it. Then he deliberately handed her his umbrella and untied his cravat, and proceeded to turn one end up and ...
... this particular moment. Why did I ever pray that I might hold her in my arms? he thought in German. Mein Gott, what shall I do? Failing ...
... you know well that you do not speak the truth,-you are so very changeable. This afternoon, par exemple, when I first come to ask you to go out, you ...
... So, that difficulty being disposed of, he ordered a species of repast with an infinite sense of amusement over the bill of fare. The waitress then ...
... meet again will be but more to suffer, he continued. I touch at the end of what I am capable to suffer. Why should I distress you for no good to any ...
... (no pun intended) of the Austrian shopkeeper just at the present epoch in the national finance system of that country. Behind the boards two uniformed ...
... they appeared so big and bright and joyous now. When did you come? she remembered to ask after a long time. I am come yesterday morning. ...
... because with you all is so different. In America it is all liberty, and no time for love. Maybe not, said Jack carelessly but we make a lot ...
... because the crowd upon the deck of the departing Liner had now become a mere blur in the distance, and distant blurs seemed to his practical nature ...
... to know how to deal with a bore. A little idiosyncrasy like that will not mar my enjoyment one bit. Do go and get him now. But some consider ...
... saw that he saw her look and avoided it. Then she was angry at such poor taste displayed in the first hour of a new acquaintance, and almost thought ...
... Instead he put his hand beneath her arm and turned her for another round of promenade. I think the automobile will be best, he said tranquilly. ...
... I think so. People were beginning to move towards the staircase. Below, the man stood ready to fling the rope. Let us go to the other ...
... lay up among the pillows, the centre of a mass of blue cambric, with tiny bands of lace confining the fulness here and there while Molly, in such ...
... and then she was choked to silence by Von Ibn, who turned and gave her a carefully cold look of complete unrecognition. It was too elaborate ...
... while you are in Constance,- perhaps. Heavy emphasis on the last perhaps. Oh, do! she pleaded. Are you going to Bayreuth? ...