Cover of A Queens Delight

A Queens Delight

Auhtor: Anonymous

Language: english

Genres:

cooking
Downloads: 210
eBook size: 82Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Queens Delight':

Fascinating 17th-century collection of stillroom recipes for fruit preserves perfumes and home remedies. Some of the ingredients may be hard to come by and some of the directions are a bit hazy but many of these recipes are perfectly possible. I recommend Sir Walter Raleighs strawberry cordial.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Queens Delight':


... very leisurely till they be clear, then take them up and boil the syrup till it batten on the dish side, and when they are cold put them up, &c. An ...
... be tender, that you may prick a Rush through them: let them be a soaking till they be almost cold, then put them up. Your Apricoks and Peaches must ...
... they look of a dark red colour, and are dry then put them up. And so you may do any manner of Fruit. In the Sun is the best drying of them, put into ...
... beaten, and put it to the Cherries in the boiling, the faster they boil, the better they will be preserved, and let them stand in a Pan till they be almost ...
... not boil after the Roses are in but pour it upon a Pye-plate, and cut it into what form you please. To make Chips of Quinces. First scald them ...
... they are the better, and lay them in Conduit water, six dayes and nights, shifting them into fresh water morning and evening then boil them very tender, ...
... and take a little more sugar than they do weigh, then put to it as much water as will cover them then boil your syrup a little while, and so let it ...
... extinguisheth thirst, asswageth the belly, and helpeth the Throat of hot hurts, sharp droppings and driness, and procureth rest: It will keep one ...
... Sieve in a warm Oven after the bread is drawn, still warming the Oven till it be dry, and they will be well candied. To Candy the Orange Roots. Take ...
... make Orange Marmalet. Take Oranges, pare them as thin as you can boil them in four several waters, let them be very soft before you take them out, ...
... one warm place to another, they will turn in a week beware you set them not too hot, for they will be tough so every day turn them till they be dry ...
... Elecampane roots, and boil them reasonably tender then pith them and peel them and so beat it in a Mortar, then take twice as much sugar as the Pulp ...
... Rose-water, rowl it round betwixt your hands, and make holes in the heads, and so string them while they be hot. To make an Ipswich Water. Take ...
... is very sweet, and good for the time. Mr.Fereneof theNew Exchange,Perfumer to the Queen, his rare Dentifrice, so much approved of at Court. First ...
... the Worms in the Belly and Stomach it cures the cold Dropsie, and helps the Stone in the Bladder, and in the Reins of the back it helps shortly the ...
... Plague. Take three pints of Malmsey, or Muscadine, of Sage and Rue, of each one handful, boil them together gently to one pint, then strain it and ...
... Diamoscus dulcis, of each six drams the Herbs being cut small, the seeds and Liquorish bruised, infuse them into two gallons of Canary Sack for ...
... well with water from their filth, and in a stone Mortar beat them to pieces, then lay in the bottom of your distilled pot Angelica two handfuls, and ...
... then strain it through an Hypocras strainer, and drink a draught of it before meat half an hour, and sometimes after to help digestion. Marigold ...
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