Cover of Early Theories Of Translation

Early Theories Of Translation

Auhtor: Flora Ross Amos

Language: english
Published: 1920

Genres:

history
Downloads: 479
eBook size: 155Kb

Review by O. Brown, June 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Early Theories Of Translation':

Early Theories Of Translation by Flora Ross Amos. This book contains the discussion of the history the theories the styles the methods and the difficulties of translation. The book imparts the art of translation by examining lots of examples from many translators. The book also dedicates one chapter for detailed discussion of the translation of the bible.

Excerpts from the Book 'Early Theories Of Translation':


... translator both due regard for the original and due regard for English literary standards who have made the most valuable contributions to theory. It ...
... their modern connotation. Translate and translation are applied very loosely even as late as the sixteenth century. The Legend of Good Women names ...
... for example, phrases like as I have heard tell, as the book says, as I find in parchment spell are rewordings of the same fact or represent ...
... Englysche tunngge y saye for me My wyttys alle to dullet bee. He telleth hys tale of sentament I vnderstonde noghth hys entent, Ne wolle ne besy me to ...
... have kept in memory the great deeds of the past. . thorough diligent labour, And enlumyned with many corious flour Of rethorik, to make us comprehend ...
... a share in the English Bible that it seemed sometimes advisable to limit their influence. Richard Grafton writes ironically to Cromwell regarding the ...
... who opposed translation. The high standard of accuracy set by such critics demanded of the translator an increasing consciousness of the difficulties ...
... Consequently ecclesiastical must always give way to popular usage. Our meaning is not, that if any Greek terms, or words of any other language, have ...
... as are not poetical. Then, as all our English songs (according to the course of our English poetry) do run in metre, so ought David's psalms to ...
... conveys of unusually favorable conditions for such work. One remembers that Tyndale originally anticipated with some confidence a residence in the Bishop ...
... Against the first of these methods there was a good deal of prejudice. Grimald in his preface to his translation of Cicero's De Officiis, protests ...
... like their medieval predecessors, to lewd people, with The Golden Book began the vogue of a new type of didactic literature, similar in its ...
... and use the talk and style of an heroical personage, expressing the silly man's meaning with lofty thundering words, in my simple judgment joins (as ...
... manner of writing and speaking in all his actions, he says in his Preface to the Reader, applying himself to the people's nature and to their understanding ...
... which bears the brunt of his attack. He is always conscious, how pedantical and absurd an affectation it is in the interpretation of any author ...
... and the Latin Virgil to be inimitable to us (whose tongue is barbarous and corrupted), but also to allege (partly through delight your majesty took ...
... author thou dost pace, How hand in hand ye go, what equal grace Thou dost observe with him in every term, They cannot but, if just, justly affirm That ...
... laborious for the Grecian is more according to my genius than the Latin poet.[417] The insistence on the necessity for kinship between the author ...
... has been repeatedly translated into most of the languages of modern Europe, these versions were rather paraphrases than faithful translations, attempts ...
... 35-6, 39, 116. Arnold, Matthew, xi, 172, 177. Arthur, 45. Ascham, Roger, 109, 114. Augustine, St., 50, 55. Authorized Version of 1611, 51, ...